Biology Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
ANT 382 Seminars in Anthropology: Renewable Natural Resources: Science & Policy (= BIO 366, ENV 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ANT 101, ENV 201, or ENV 202 is required. (Not offered 2016-2017)

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

BIO 102 Special Topics in Biology I
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students who have credit for BIO 111/113 or 112/114 except by permission of the chair.

Introduction to the science of biology designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors.  Course content and emphasis will vary with instructor.  No laboratory. 

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement. 
 

BIO 103 Microbes & Human Disease
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students who have credit for BIO 106, 111/113, or 112/114, except by permission of the chair. 

Instructor
McNally

Introduction to the science of biology by examining microscopic organisms and their influence on human health.  Designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors.  No laboratory. 

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement. 
 

BIO 106 Microbes & Our Health
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students who have credit for Biology 103, 111/113, or 112/114 except by permission of the chair.

Instructor
McNally

Introduction to the science of biology by examining microscopic organisms and their influence on human health.  Designed to meet science distribution requirement of non-science majors.  One laboratory meeting per week.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 107 Special Topics in Biology II
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students who have credit for BIO 111/113 or 112/114 except by permission of the chair.

Introduction to the science of biology designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors.  Course content and emphasis will vary with instructor.  One laboratory meeting per week. 

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 108 Human Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students who have credit for BIO 111/113 or 112/114 except by permission of the chair. 

Instructor
McNally

Introduction to the science of biology by exploring human health, physiology, and disease.  Designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors.  One laboratory meeting per week.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 109 Biology of Plants
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students who have credit for BIO 105, 111/113, or 112/114, except by permission of the chair.

Instructor
Staff

Introduction to the science of biology through topics in botany.  Designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors.  One laboratory meeting per week.

Satisfies Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 111 Molecules, Genes, & Cells
Prerequisites & Notes

Students with credit for BIO 113 may not enroll in BIO 111.

Instructors
Barsoum, Bernd, Hales, Sarafova, Wessner

Introduction to the unifying principles of biology at the levels of organization from molecules through cells.  The main topics include biochemistry and bioenergetics, cell structure and physiology, and Mendelian and molecular genetics.  A laboratory, emphasizing planning, performing, and presenting experiments, meets once each week. Students may take BIO 111 with either BIO 112 or BIO 114 to complete biology introductory course requirements.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 112 Organisms, Evolution, & Ecosystems
Prerequisites & Notes

Students with credit for BIO 114 may not enroll in BIO 112.

Instructors
Barsoum, Stanback

Introduction to organismal and superorganismal biology.  Topics include evolution, ecology, and animal anatomy and physiology.  Laboratory sessions meet once a week and are comprised of investigative exercises and some animal dissections. Students may take BIO 112 with either BIO 111 or BIO 113 to complete biology introductory course requirements.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 113 Integrated Concepts in Biology I
Prerequisites & Notes

Students with credit for BIO 111 may not enroll in BIO 113.

Instructors
M. Campbell, El Bejjani

Introduction to biology's core concepts from molecules through cells including information, evolution, cells, emergent properties, and homeostasis.  The weekly laboratory emphasizes core competencies of the process of science, the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology, data interpretation, quantitative skills, communication in multiple formats, and experience with large databases.  Students may take BIO 113 with either BIO 112 or BIO 114 to complete biology introductory course requirements.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.

BIO 114 Integrated Concepts in Biology II
Prerequisites & Notes

Students with credit for BIO 112 may not enroll in BIO 114.

Instructors
Paradise, Peroni, K. Smith

Introduction to biology's core concepts from organisms through ecological systems including information, evolution, cells, emergent properties, and homeostasis.  The weekly laboratory emphasizes core competencies of the process of science, the interdisciplinary nature of modern biology, data interpretation, quantitative skills, communication in multiple formats, and experience with large databases.  Students may take BIO 114 with either BIO 111 or BIO 113 to satisfy upper level prerequisites, pre-med requirements, and biology major requirements.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
 

BIO 184 Environmental Field Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Study at some centers meets the cultural diversity requirement. See http://www.bio.davidson.edu/sfs/

Twelve-week, four-course semester program at one of five School for Field Studies or Duke University Marine Lab research centers.  Grading is Pass/Fail. BIO 184 does not count for biology major credit. 

BIO 201 Genetics
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111/113 is required.  BIO 112/114, CHE 115, and/or CHE 250 is recommended.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructors 
El Bejjani, Hales, Sarafova

Integration of molecular and classical genetics, including the physical nature of genetic material, the many levels of gene and genome regulation, transmission of genetic information and patterns of inheritance, gene mapping/identification via traditional and modern methods, and genetic engineering in many contexts.

BIO 202 Microbiology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Wessner

An introduction to the diverse world of microbes.  Topics include the structure, metabolism, identification, and genetics of archaeons, bacteria, and viruses.  Special emphasis is placed on interactions between microbes and humans, both in terms of pathogenesis and biotechnology.  Laboratory focuses on isolating, identifying, and characterizing bacteria and viruses using a series of classical and molecular techniques.

BIO 208 Cell Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.  Students with credit for BIO 238 may not enroll in BIO 208.

Instructor
Bernd

Examination of the multitude of coordinated interactions that must occur between sub-cellular compartments for a cell to be able to function and to respond adequately to its local environment.  Laboratory focuses on analysis of signaling and response mechanisms used by eukaryotic cells and includes student-designed research projects. 

BIO 209 Bioinformatics Programming (= CSC 209)
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students with credit for CSC 120 (= DIG 120), CSC 121, or CSC 200 (=PHY 200).  

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed as CSC 209)  An interdisciplinary introduction to computer science and structured programming using the Python programming language in the context of biological datasets and applications, including algorithms for analyzing genomic data.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

BIO 212 Animal Physiology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 are required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor
Staff

Introduction to the physical and chemical principles governing the lives of animals with an emphasis on understanding the physiological problems animals face, how those problems vary in relation to animals' environments, and the processes by which animals solve their problems.  Topics include thermal biology, water regulation, gas exchange, transport, and energetics.  The laboratory focuses on independent investigation.

BIO 216 Botany
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 are required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor
Peroni

Introduction to the fundamentals of plant biology.  Topics include: anatomy, physiology, taxonomy, and diversity of plants.

BIO 217 Insects and People
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful compleation of BIO 111/113 and 112/114

Instructor

Paradise

Biology of insects and related arthropods, structured around application and investigation of the relationship between humans and insects. Significant broad topics inculde medical and veterinary entomology, forensic entomology, the role of insects in human history and culture, biodiversity of and ecosystem services provided by insects, and conservation.

BIO 222 Vertebrate Zoology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B. Not open to students with credit for BIO 232

Instructor
Stanback

Natural history of vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, birds) emphasizing phylogeny, adaptations, ecology, and behavior. Laboratory sessions involve field experiments, identification of local tetrapods, and some dissection.  One weekend field trip is required.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

 

BIO 223 Animal Behavior (=PSY 323)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B. Counts towards the Psychology major as a Research Methods course in the Cognitive/Neuroscience column.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 233.

 

Instructor 
Stanback 

An evolutionary approach to the study of animal behavior.  Laboratories include research projects on the behavior of animals in captivity and in the natural environment.   

BIO 227 Conservation Biology & Biodiversity
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO112/114, ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor
K. Smith

This course focuses on the scientific study of biological diversity, its rapid loss in recent decades, and approaches for its conservation.  Broad topics include the definition and measurement of biodiversity, the value of biodiversity to humans, causes of biodiversity loss and extinction in the modern world, how biodiversity can be managed and conserved, as well as the challenges posed by the human dimensions of biodiversity and conservation.  Students will focus intensively on the primary literature in this course, with an emphasis on the interpretation of data and the design of investigations in conservation biology.  After completing this course, students should be able to apply the scientific method, data analysis, biological theory, and critical thought to real-world conflicts between human needs and the conservation of biological diversity.  The laboratory focuses on biodiversity and conservation assessment including field work and occasional field trips.

Satisfies Natural Science distribution requirement. Satisfies a depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Enviromental Studies major or minor.
 

BIO 232 Vertebrate Natural History
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, or ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 222.

 

Instructor
Stanback

Natural history of vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, birds) emphasizing phylogeny, adaptations, ecology, and behavior. No laboratory.

BIO 233 Behavioral Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 is required.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 223.

Instructor 
Stanback 

Behavioral ecology represents the intersection of Animal Behavior, Evolutionary Biology, and Ecology.  Behavioral ecologists are particularly interested in the fitness consequences (the adaptive significance) of the behavior of animals.  In this course, we will investigate foraging behavior, anti-predator behavior, territorial behavior, conflict, sexual selection, mating systems, parental care, and social systems.

BIO 238 Cell Biology & Signaling
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  Students with credit for BIO 208 may not enroll in BIO 238.

Instructor
Bernd

In order to coordinate function within multicellular eukaryotic organisms, organelles, and cells utilize an array of molecular transport and communication mechanisms.  Students compare wild type and altered signaling from phenotype to changes in the signaling mechanism.  Examples draw from human genetic variation and changes due to exposure to environmental toxicants.  No laboratory.

BIO 240 Biostatistics for Life Scientists
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, or ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.   

Instructors
Peroni, Pittman, K. Smith

Probability, descriptive statistics, and proper application, interpretation, and reporting of inferential statistics for biological research.  Instruction in experimental design and use of statistical and graphics software. Recommended for pre-med and pre-veterinary students as well as those who plan to enroll in Biology group investigation or independent study courses.

Satisfies Mathematical & Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the methodology course requirement for the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major.

BIO 250 Group Investigations
Prerequisites & Notes

Prerequisites and/or permission of the instructor vary by course. 

Series of courses numbered BIO 250-259 & BIO 350-359 introducing students to methods and techniques of biological research.  Courses may serve as background to student decisions for optional research experiences.

BIO 251 Light Microscopy
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.

Instructor
Lom

This group investigation course is a research-based, collaborative experience to build practical and theoretical knowledge of tissue preparation techniques and foundational light microscopy techniques such as brightfield, phase, fluorescence, and confocal microscopy.  Emerging methodologies such as superresolution and light sheet microscopy are also considered.

BIO 252 Avian Behavioral Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 or BIO 223/233 is required.

Instructor
Stanback

This group investigation course focuses on the behavioral ecology of Eastern bluebirds, Carolina chickadees, and Eastern screech-owls, examining aspects such as clutch size, nest vulnerability, brood parasitism, human activity, neophobia, egg quality, and food caches.  Class activities include data analysis, literature review, and manuscript production through group and individual meetings.

BIO 256 Applied Insect Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of instructor is required.

Instructor
Paradise

This group investigation course examines applied ecology problems in insect pollinator communities and/or populations of urban forest pests.  Pollinator communities may be adversely affected in an urbanizing landscape, while a forest pest may actually benefit in the same landscape.  Students investigate the effects of park size, location, surrounding land use, and plant diversity on insect pollinator diversity.  Students may also investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of the fall cankerworm as well as assess the effectiveness of control efforts.  Projects have community-based learning and outreach components.  Students study insect population and community ecology, learn basic GIS and other digital skills, insect identification, and hone skills in experimental design, data analysis, and science communication.

BIO 257 Tree Taxonomy & Identification: Dendrology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of instructor is required.

Instructor
Peroni

This group investigation course provides a survey of the taxonomy of woody plants and an introduction to the major forest biomes of the mountain and piedmont regions of North Carolina and southwestern Virginia.  Students learn how to identify trees, shrubs, and woodly vies using summer and winter characteristics.  Class meetings emphasize time spent in the field.

BIO 260 Perspective on Darwinism
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 or permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Putnam

This seminar course focuses on the historical importance of the Darwinian revolution in biology.  To understand more fully Darwin's accomplishments, students study evolutionary and anti-evolutionary thinkers who came before him.  In doing so, students come to understand more deeply the resistance to the Origin of Species at the time of its publication and similar resistance to evolutionary thinking before the Darwinian era.  Post-Darwinian controversies of the late 19th and early 20th century are considered as well as those emerging in contemporary biology.

BIO 261 Neuroscience of Exercise
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 plus at least one other Biology course or CHE 115 are required.  Restricted to sophomores and juniors.

Instructor
Lom

A seminar course examining the research investigating how physical activity influences the brain at multiple levels (molecular, cellular, physiology, behavioral).  Emphasis is placed on developing strategies for identifying, reading, analyzing, and discussing a variety of literature on the topic (reviews, basic research, government documents, clinical research, public health studies, popular press reports, etc.).  Oral communication, visual communication, and/or writing skills are also emphasized as ways to share scientific research with audiences of scientists and non-scientists. 

BIO 262 Forensic Serology
Prerequisites & Notes

Sucessful completion of BIO 111/113 and at least one upper level group A biology course are required. Permission of the instructor required to register for the course.

Instructor
Bernd

This seminar focuses on the science behind the courthouse headlines as we discuss the biological theory and analytical techniques that form forensic serology's bacis. Topics include the composition of blood and semen, the molecular basis for enzymatic and antibody based analytical techniques, DNA analysis (RFLPs, VTNRs, and SNPs), and modes of inheritance of different markers (nuclear or mitochondrial DNA and protein). We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of applying these techniques to samples collected in 'real life' situations and the potential ethical implications of DNA databases such as CODIS. In addition to participating in discussions of technical literature, students will give multiple oral presentations to the class and to public audiences.

BIO 263 Representations of HIV/AIDS (= ENG 285)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.

Instructor
Wessner

What happens when literary critics and scientists converse?  In this team-taught course, we examine texts related to HIV/AIDS through the lens of the artist and the lens of the biologist.

Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement. 

BIO 264 Evolutionary Medicine
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114.

Instructor
Stanback

Evolutionary concepts help explain why we remain vulnerable to disease, how pathogens and cancer cells evolve, and how the diseases that affected our evolutionary ancestors have shaped our biology.  In this seminar, we will read and discuss a new book by Stearns and Medzhitov (2015): Evolutionary Medicine.  Topics include defense mechanisms, pathogen evolution, cancer, reproductive medicine, mismatch, and mental disorders.

BIO 267 Cases in Environmental Health
Prerequisites & Notes

Sucessful completion of BIO 111/113, BIO 112/114, or ENV 201 is required.  

Instructor
Bernd

Environmental health focuses on the factors external to people that have health implications.  In this seminar students develop skills in literature research, critical analysis, and communication exploring the intersection between cell biology, public health, and the environment.  Broad topics include regional and global examples investigating air quality, water quality, and exposure to environmental chemicals.  In groups, students define sub areas of interest such as home air quality, water purification byproducts, or mercury.  Students use research, creativity, and communication skills to compile materials and write case studies that are appropriate for use in undergraduate cell biology courses.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 303 Biochemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113, BIO 112/114, and CHE 250 are required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Ward

Introduction to the principles of biochemistry.  Emphasis is placed on enzymology, structure of biomolecules, and cellular metabolism.  Laboratory emphasizes  enzyme purification and characterization.

BIO 305 Microanatomy of Vertebrates (Histology)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 or permission of the instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor
Putnam

Microanatomy of the cell with particular reference to organelles that are altered in the process of development of the four major tissues of the body (epithelial, connective, muscular, and nervous).

BIO 306 Developmental Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  BIO 201 or 208/238 recommended.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 336.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Lom

Investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development covering topics such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, axis specification, and organogenesis via analysis of classical and modern experiments.  Laboratory sessions emphasize experimental manipulations of early embryos culminating in student-designed research projects.

BIO 307 Immunology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113, CHE 115, and one of the following: BIO 201, 202, or 208/238 are required.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 337.  Limited to juniors and seniors or permission of instructor.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Sarafova

Introduction to the immune system with an emphasis on mammalian models.  Course focuses on the cellular and molecular levels of the immune system in health and disease.  Topics include recognition of antigens, development of lymphocyte repertoires, and adaptive immune responses.

BIO 309 Genomics
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful compeletion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 and one of the following: BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 209, 303, 306/336, 307/337, 333, or 343 are required.  Satisfies group A only in combination with BIO 343.

Instructor
M. Campbell

Students use published resources to understand how genome-scale information (e.g., DNA sequences, genome variations, transcriptomes, proteomes, and clinical studies) can provide a systems biology perspective. Students also use databases and bioinformatics tools to analyze data and post their analyses online.  May be taken simultaneously with BIO 343.

BIO 310 Human Physiology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113, BIO 112/114, and CHE 115 are required.  Successful completion of at least one of the following is recommended:  BIO 208/238, BIO 303, CHE 220, CHE 230, PHY 120 and 220, or PHY 130 and 230.

Instructor
Barsoum

An advanced discussion of the integrated biology of humans. Students consider physiological phenomena from the molecular and cellular to the systemic level. Topics include the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and reproductive systems. The biochemical and biophysical principles underlying the function of these systems are examined. Anatomy is introduced as a means to understanding function. Students analyze and present primary research literature in mammalian physiology.

BIO 311 Comparative Anatomy
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 or permission of the instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor
Putnam

Major organ systems of the vertebrate body are examined in light of major evolutionary changes from primitive Pisces to the more advanced Amphibia, Reptilia, and Mammalia.  Laboratory involves dissection of the shark and the cat.

BIO 317 Entomology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor 
Paradise

Biology of insects and related arthropods, structured around application and investigation of issues such as medical entomology, evolutionary history, biodiversity and systematics of insects, forensic entomology, conservation, and ecology.  Major emphasis in the laboratory involves an independent research project, field trips, and the making of a collection of local insects.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 321 Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructors
Paradise, Peroni

The study of interactions between organisms and their environment at the levels of populations, communities, and ecosystems.  Course includes lab with investigative and independent field experiments. 

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 331 Behavioral Neuroscience (= PSY 303)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of PSY 101 or BIO 111/113 and 112/114 as well as permission of the instructor are required. 

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as PSY 303)  Role of the nervous system; sensory and motor mechanism; physiological bases of motivation and emotion; sleep and arousal; and physiological bases of learning, memory, and language.  Extensive laboratory training.  Work with animals is required.

BIO 332 Functional Neuroanatomy (= PSY 324)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of PSY 303 (BIO 331) and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as PSY 324)  Intensive readings in molecular neurobiology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and/or behavior.  Students: 1) make classroom presentations of critical analyses of the course readings; 2) conduct laboratory research or hospital rounds; and 3) submit an annotated bibliography and a write-up of the laboratory project or term paper.

BIO 333 Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111/113 and one of the following: BIO 201 (strongly recommended), 208/238, 306/336, 309, or 331 are required.  Not open to first-year students.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
El  Bejjani

An advanced examination of neurons at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics include the structure of neurons and glia, neurogenesis, synapse formation, and the molecular basis of neuronal signaling and communication. Special attention is paid to nervous system development, degeneration, and the molecular basis of common neurological disorders. Laboratory projects examine cell signaling events that shape neuron morphology.

BIO 336 Animal Development
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required with BIO 201 and/or 208/238 recommended.  Students with credit for BIO 306 may not enroll in BIO 336.

Instructor
Lom

Investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development from fertilization to organogenesis, emphasizing classical and modern experiments.  No laboratory

BIO 337 Principles of Immunology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and one of the following:  BIO 201, 202, or BIO 208/238 are required.  Students with credit for BIO 307 may not enroll in BIO 337. 

Instructor
Sarafova

Introduction to the immune system with an emphasis on mammalian models.  The course focuses on the cellular and molecular levels of the immune system in health and disease.  Topics include recognition of antigens, development of lymphocyte repertoires, and adaptive immune responses. No laboratory.

BIO 342 Evolutionary Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 is required.

Instructor
Stanback

A literature-based discussion of current topics and trends in evolutionary biology.

BIO 343 Laboratory Methods in Genomics
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, plus one of the following:  BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 209, 303, 306/336, 307/337, 309, or 333 are required.  Satisfies group A only in combination with BIO 309.

Instructor
M. Campbell

In this lab-only course, students participate in a real genome sequencing project (sequencing performed off-site).  Students analyze sequences and annotate genes in the genome.  This original research is computer intensive and contributes to the growing body of knowledge in genomics.  Students participate in collaborative research projects and generate reports of their findings.  May be taken simultaneously with BIO 309.

BIO 351 Herpetological Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and permission of instructor required.

Instructor
Staff

Students focus on learning all aspects of the research progress by developing scientific questions in herpetology, conducting research to address those questions, and publishing/presenting their research in this group investigation course. 

BIO 352 Genetics of Mitochondrial Shaping
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and permission of the instructor are required.  BIO 201 is strongly recommended.

Instructor
Hales

This group investigation course addresses unanswered questions concerning genes associated with mitochondrial dynamics in developing sperm of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster using molecular biology, classical genetics, and microscopy.

BIO 355 Genome Editing
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.

Instructor
El Bejjani

Very recently revolutionary new techniques made it possible to edit the genomes of living organisms directly.  Scientists can now, theoretically, engineer any living cell in very specific manners.  This group investigation course explores the technical literature on genome editing and current uses of the methods in research and in the repair of genetic diseases.  In parallel, students design experiments to edit the genome of C. elegans animals and engineer worms for research purposes. 

BIO 356 Diversity & Extinction Analysis (= ENV 356)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and BIO 227 or 321 is required.  Completion of BIO 240 is recommended.

Instructor
K. Smith

This group investigation course focuses on the analysis of patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity loss. Students conduct literature reviews to compile data on biodiversity and/or extinction events to identify patterns of biodiversity, biodiversity function, and extinctions, with the goal of understanding the causes and consequences of biodiversity variation and loss. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of biodiversity data and the development of novel analyses to address issues such as sampling effects, extinction bias, random extinction, and emergent properties of biodiversity. The course culminates with a group project that addresses student-driven questions via the application of analyses developed during the semester.

BIO 357 Biotoxicity of Hookah Tobacco Smoke
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of CHE 115, BIO 111/113, and at least one BIO 200+ course are required.

Instructor permission is required to register for the course.

Restricted to juniors and seniors

 

Instructor
Bernd

Pairs of students will investigate whether altering hookah configurations changes the resulting smoke's affect on cultured lung cells, as measured by biochemical analysis of cellular viability metrics. The group investigation will include significant experimental design and bench research as well as oral presentations to different audiences, preparing and presenting a scientific poster, and writing a research article. 

BIO 360 Biology of HIV/AIDS
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201, 202, or 208/238 and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Wessner

In this upper-level seminar course, students read and discuss primary journal articles related to HIV/AIDS in a chronological fashion, beginning with the first scientific reports of HIV/AIDS from 1981 and progressing through the most recent articles.  Through this in-depth analysis of the scientific literature, students see how current advances in the field are predicated on earlier knowledge and begin to learn how technological advancements have led to new scientific knowledge. Throughout the semester, students also examine popular press accounts of major scientific advancements and investigate the role of reportage in this pandemic.

BIO 361 Amphibian & Reptile Conservation
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and permission of instructor are required.

Instructor
Staff

A seminar-style course where students focus on discussion of the major issues in the conservation of amphibians and reptiles worldwide.  The course involves numerous guest speakers, student-led discussions, and a major project requirement that contributes to amphibian and reptile conservation.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or minor.

BIO 362 Issues in Reproductive Medicine
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 or permission of instructor are required.

Instructor
Case

Advances in medical science give us an ever-increasing mastery of our "natural" reproductive processes.  Technologies for controlling our fertility, diagnosing and treating the fetus, and allowing premature neonates to complete their development ex-utero challenge our traditional ideas of parenthood, family, and even personal identity.  This seminar course addresses a myriad of economic, sociocultural, ethical, and legal questions by the new reproductive technologies.  The course is discussion-based, includes a semester-long project, and involves technology applications.

BIO 363 Human Genetics
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201 and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Hales

This upper-level seminar focuses on different human genetic disorders with primary research papers as the main resource.  Students explore 1) the methods by which the genes associated with each disorder were identified; 2) the biology of the disorder at the organism, tissue, cell, and molecular level; and 3) strategies to treat each condition with gene therapy and other methods.

BIO 364 Immune System Dysfunction
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 303, 306/336, or 307/337 is required.  Restricted to juniors and seniors.

Instructor
Sarafova

This seminar course builds upon the knowledge from Immunology (BIO 307/337) in which basic immunology vocabulary and concepts are first introduced.  Students use case studies of immunological disorders to synthesize and apply knowledge to actual cases, become familiar with the techniques used to investigate immune system dysfunction in clinical research and in animal models of human disease, and learn to evaluate experimental design critically by presenting and evaluating scientific arguments from the primary literature.  Students integrate these newly acquired skills by writing a short proposal for a clinical or research study.

BIO 365 Biology of Cancer
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 plus one of the following: BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 303, 306/336, 307/337, 309 + 343, or 333.

Instructor
Melonakos

Investigates the molecular basis of cancer through a study of the hallmarks of cancer, signal transduction pathways, cancer critical genes, and current therapeutic approaches.  Seminal experiments in the field of cancer biology are discussed throughout.

 

BIO 366 Renewable Natural Resources: Science & Policy (= ANT 382, ENV 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ANT 101, ENV 201, or ENV 202 is required.

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

BIO 367 Ecotoxicology (= ENV 367)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/14 or ENV 201 is required as well as permission of the instructor.  CHE 115 is recommended.

Instructor
Paradise

Ecotoxicology is the science that examines the fate and effects of toxicants in and on ecological systems.  Although toxicology examines effects at molecular, cell, and organism levels, effects at higher levels are not always predictable based on findings at lower levels.  Ecotoxicology integrates effects at multiple levels of biological organization.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 368 Health Care Issues in Zambia
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor is required.  Fee.

Instructor
Case

An interdisciplinary examination of the impact of disease on the people in sub Saharan Africa.  The course includes a one-month cultural and medical experience in Mwandi, Zambia during the summer, preceded by preparatory meetings during the spring semester and culminating in a seminar in the fall semester following the trip.  Students submit applications and are interviewed for the course during the fall semester preceding the next summer's trip.

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

BIO 370 Directed Reading in Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of at least one course above BIO 200.

This course allows a student with a substantial background in biology (usually a junior or senior major) to pursue intensive readings of the original scientific literature in a specific area of study not represented in the Biology curriculum or not offered during the student's attendance at Davidson.  The course frequently culminates in a substantial paper and/or oral presentation.  Admission is by consent of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic then closely supervises and evaluates the student's work.  The student develops a written plan of study (syllabus) in collaboration with the faculty member following the guidelines on the Independent Course Contract form available through the Registrar.  BIO 370 may be repeated on a different topic with the chair's permission. 

BIO 371 Research in Biology I
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of at least one course above BIO 200.

Field, bench, or modeling laboratory investigative work or other original research under the direction and supervision of a Biology faculty member who reviews and approves the research topic and methodology.  Research is presented at the end of the semester in a scientific paper, poster, and/or oral presentation.  Admission is by consent of the supervising faculty member who also evaluates the student's work.  The student develops a written plan of study (syllabus) in collaboration with the faculty member following the guidelines on the Independent Course Contract form available through the Registrar.  BIO 371 may be repeated on a different project in a different research lab.

BIO 372 Research in Biology II
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 371.

A second semester of continued original field, bench, or modeling laboratory investigative work or other original research under the direction and supervision of a Biology faculty member who reviews and approves the research topic and methodology.  Research is presented at the end of the semester in a scientific paper, poster, and/or oral presentation.  Admission is by consent of the supervising faculty member who also evaluates the student's work.  The student develops a written plan of study (syllabus) in collaboration with the faculty member following the guidelines on the Independent Course Contract form available through the Registrar. 

BIO 373 Research in Biology III
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 371 and BIO 372.

A third semester of continued , original field, bench, or modeling laboratory or other original research under the direction and supervision of a Biology faculty member who reviews and approves the research topic and methodology.  Research is presented at the end of the semester in a scientific paper, poster, and/or oral presentation.  Admission is by consent of the supervising faculty member who also evaluates the student's work.  The student develops a written plan of study (syllabus) in collaboration with the faculty member following the guidelines on the Independent Course Contract form available through the Registrar. 

BIO 374 Research in Biology IV
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 371, BIO 372, and BIO 373.

A fourth semester of continued field, bench, modeling, or other original research under the direction and supervision of a Biology faculty member who reviews and approves the research topic and methodology.  Research is presented at the end of the semester in a scientific paper, poster, and/or oral presentation.  Admission is by consent of the supervising faculty member who also evaluates the student's work.  The student develops a written plan of study (syllabus) in collaboration with the faculty member following the guidelines on the Independent Course Contract form available through the Registrar. 

BIO 379 Thesis in Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 371 and prior departmental acceptance of a thesis proposal.

A student with prior departmental approval of a biology thesis proposal registers for this course during the semester in which the research is completed and the thesis is written, presented, and defended (all following department thesis guidelines delineated in the Biology Major Handbook and in consultation with Biology's Thesis Coordinator).  Admission is by consent of the primary reader/supervising faculty member who also evaluates the student's work.  The student develops a written plan of study (syllabus) in collaboration with the faculty member following the guidelines on the Independent Course Contract form available through the Registrar. 

BIO 381 Environmental Field Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

See bio.davidson.edu/sfs

Twelve-week, four-course semester program (BIO 184, 381, 382, and 383) at one of five School for Field Studies or Duke University Marine Lab research centers.  Grading is Pass/Fail.  BIO 381 may be counted for major credit.

BIO 382 Environmental Field Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

See bio.davidson.edu/sfs.  

Twelve-week, four-course semester program (BIO 184, 381, 382, and 383) at one of five School for Field Studies or Duke University Marine Lab research centers.  Grading is Pass/Fail.  BIO 382 may be counted for major credit.

BIO 383 Environmental Field Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

See bio.davidson.edu/sfs. 

Twelve-week, four-course semester program (BIO 184, 381, 382, and 383) at one of five School for Field Studies or Duke University Marine Lab research centers.  Grading is Pass/Fail.  BIO 383 may be counted for major credit.

BIO 385 Techniques in Environmental Field Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required.  See bio.davidson.edu/programs/sfs/sfshome.htm.

One-month intensive field work course for science majors during the summer in selected School for Field Studies locations around the world.  Grading is pass/fail but may be counted for major credit.

BIO 391 RNA Worlds
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201 or permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Raymond

Non-protein-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) serve as genomes, catalysts, adaptors, regulators, structural components, and evolutionary substrates to control a diverse range of biological processes in all three domains of life.  In this seminar course, discussions of primary literature and subsequent writing assignments reveal and explore our current understanding of the evolution and roles of non-coding RNAs.

BIO 392 Medical Biotechnology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 303, 306/336, 307/337, or 333 is required.

Instructor
Sarafova

This seminar course explores the biological and chemical principles behind the newest biotechnology tools in medicine. Topics such as nanotechnology based drug delivery approaches, 3D organ printing for transplantation, cancer immunotherapy approaches, and molecular diagnostic tools will be selected based on student interest. Students will analyze primary literature, then organize and present findings in oral presentations and term papers.

BIO 393 Advances in Genome Editing
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO111/113 is required, BIO 201 is recommended.  Not open to students who have credit for BIO 355.

Instructor

El Bejjani

Revolutionary new techniques that make direct genome editing in living organisms allow scientists the potential to engineer any living cell in very specific manners.  This seminar course explores the technical literature on genome editing as well as the rapidly expanding uses of genome editing methods in research and the repair of genetic diseases. 

BIO 395 Biochemistry Seminar (= CHE 430)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 303, CHE 230, or permission of instructor is required. 

Instructors
Myers, Sarafova

This advanced seminar course examines selected topics in biochemistry by examining primary literature.

BIO 396 Ecology of Disease (= ENV 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 are required.

Instructor
Peroni

This upper-level seminar examines on how ecological theory can contribute to understanding and preventing the emergence and progression of disease.  Students use literature from ecology, epidemiology, microbiome research, and physiology to explore diseases of vertebrate animals.  Writing intensive.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor. 

BIO 397 Invasion Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 or ENV 201 and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Staff

Invasive species represent one of the biggest threats to biodiversity and ecosystems worldwide.  In this seminar-style course students focus on developing an understanding of the major issues related to biological invasions.  The class involves in-depth, student-led discussions of peer-reviewed publications, guest speakers, and a class project.

CHE 430 Seminar in Biological Chemistry (=BIO 395)
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 330, or by permission of the instructor; Biology 111. No laboratory. (Spring)

Instructor
Myers

Advanced topics in biochemistry related to instructor's areas of interest and expertise. Serves as a capstone course for the Chemistry Major with an Emphasis in Biochemistry and the Biochemistry Interdisciplinary Minor.

CSC 209 Bioinformatics Programming (= BIO 209)
Prerequisites & Notes

Does not carry Mathematics major credit. Not open to students with credit for CSC 120 (=DIG 120), CSC 121 or CSC 200 (= PHY 200).  (Fall) 

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed as Biology 209.) An interdisciplinary introduction to computer science and structured programming using the Python programming language in the context of biological datasets and applications, including algorithms for analyzing genomic data.  

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

ENG 285 Representations of HIV/AIDS (= BIO 263)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Fox, Wessner

(Cross-listed as Biology 263). What happens when literary critics and scientists converse? In this team-taught course, we will examine texts related to HIV/AIDS through the lens of the artist and the lens of the biologist.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

ENV 356 Diversity & Extinction Analysis (= BIO 356)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
K. Smith

This group investigation course focuses on the analysis of patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity loss. Students conduct literature reviews to compile data on biodiversity and/or extinction events to identify patterns of biodiversity, biodiversity function, and extinctions, with the goal of understanding the causes and consequences of biodiversity variation and loss. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of biodiversity data and the development of novel analyses to address issues such as sampling effects, extinction bias, random extinction, and emergent properties of biodiversity. The course culminates with a group project that addresses student-driven questions via the application of analyses developed during the semester.

Prerequisites & Notes
Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and BIO 227 or 321 is required.  Completion of BIO 240 is recommended.

ENV 366 Renew Natural Resources: Science and Policy (= BIO 366, ANT 382)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

ENV 367 Ecotoxicology (= BIO 367)
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111 and 112 (or 113 and 114) or ENV 201 required and permission of the instructor required; CHE 115 recommended.

Instructor
Paradise

Ecotoxicology is the science that examines the fate and effects of toxicants in and on ecological systems.  While toxicology examines effects at molecular, cell, and organism levels, effects at higher levels are not always predictable based on findings at lower levels. Ecotoxicology integrates effects at multiple levels of biological organization.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

PSY 303 Psychological Research-Behavioral Neuroscience (= BIO 331)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101 or Biology 111/113 and Biology 112/114, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as Biology 331.) Role of the nervous system; sensory and motor mechanism; physiological bases of motivation and emotion; sleep and arousal; and physiological bases of learning, memory, and language. Extensive laboratory training.  Work with animals is required.  Recommended completion by Fall of senior year for majors.

PSY 323 Animal Behavior (= BIO 223)
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 112/114.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Counts towards the Psychology major as a Research Methods course in the Cognitive/Neuroscience column. (Not offered 2015-2016.)

Instructor

Stanback

 

(Cross-listed as Biology 223.) An evolutionary approach to the study of animal behavior.  Laboratories include rsearch projects on the behavior of animals in captivity and in the natural environment.
 

PSY 324 Functional Neuroanatomy (= BIO 332)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 303 (Biology 331) and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as Biology 332.) Intensive readings in molecular neurobiology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and/or behavior. Students: 1) make classroom presentations of critical analyses of the course readings; 2) conduct laboratory research or hospital rounds; and 3) submit an annotated bibliography and a write-up of the laboratory project or term paper. 

For Psychology majors this meets the major's seminar requirement. 
For Interdisciplinary Minors in Neuroscience, this course satisfies the interdisciplinary minor requirement as stated in Interdisciplinary Minor in Neuroscience (Requirements, section 1b).