Communication Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
ANT 205 Ethnic Relations
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Bowles

Comparative and historical study of social processes related to ethnic differences in modern complex societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal distribution of power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 310 Politics, Society, and Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Staff

Examines authority, organization, power, and legitimization of authority using a comparative perspective. Community-based learning model facilitates exploration of environmental justice and grassroots change with an emphasis on the symbolic aspects of power, structural inequity, and social movements.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 343 Feminist Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Bowles

Explores how gender ideologies shape the exercise of power upon men and women in different societies and cultures. Topics include the construction of masculinity and femininity, commodification and consumption of gender, social position, agency, and the political economy of gender. Emphasis on developing an understanding of different theoretical perspectives in the cross-cultural study of gender.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 357 Language Before History
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Ringle

This course considers three questions concerning the early history of language: 1) at what stage of human evolution did language appear; 2) what were the reasons behind the spread of the major language families; 3) when and where did literacy first develop and under what circumstances.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

Introduction to the theories and methods necessary for making ethnographic films. Students will conduct fieldwork and make a documentary film on a particular aspect of social and cultural behavior. Emphasis is placed on developing the critical skills needed for resolving some of the ethical, technical, and aesthetic problems that may emerge during the documentation of social and cultural behavior.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

BIO 260 Perspective on Darwinism
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 or permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Putnam

This seminar course focuses on the historical importance of the Darwinian revolution in biology.  To understand more fully Darwin's accomplishments, students study evolutionary and anti-evolutionary thinkers who came before him.  In doing so, students come to understand more deeply the resistance to the Origin of Species at the time of its publication and similar resistance to evolutionary thinking before the Darwinian era.  Post-Darwinian controversies of the late 19th and early 20th century are considered as well as those emerging in contemporary biology.

BIO 263 Representations of HIV/AIDS (= ENG 285)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.

Instructor
Wessner

What happens when literary critics and scientists converse?  In this team-taught course, we examine texts related to HIV/AIDS through the lens of the artist and the lens of the biologist.

Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement. 

CHI 225 Crime and the Chinese Detective Fiction and Film
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.

Instructor
Shao

The purpose of this course is to build on the student's knowledge of the crime and detective fiction and film in their own language(s) and extend it to the crime and detective fiction and film in the Chinese context.  The course approaches the genre from a multi-cultural perspective.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Literature distribution requirement.

CHI 405 Seminar: Topics in Chinese Cinema and Modern Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. May repeat for credit if the subject is different.

Instructor
V. Shen
 

Reading and discussion of selected works in Chinese literature and cinema. Discussion of individual research projects.

Students entering before 2012: satisfies Literature distribution requirement.

COM 101 Principles of Oral Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall and Spring)

Instructor
Staff

Examination and implementation of both classical and contemporary principles of effective oral communication. Individual presentations informed by readings, discussions, lectures, and examinations of key speeches.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.

COM 201 Introduction to Communication Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

A survey of the nature and processes of communication. Begins with basic concepts of communication, including language, nonverbal processes, perception, listening, and adaptation to audiences; then examines communication in specific contexts, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, public, and mass communication.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.

Satisfies a Communication Studies Interdisciplinary minor requirement.

COM 202 Methods in Rhetorical Criticism
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hogan, Leslie

A survey of methods in rhetorical analysis of oral, written, and visual discourses. Covers neo-classical criticism, Burkean dramatism, narrative, metaphoric, genre, and social movement criticism, and various ideological and post-structural methods, including feminist criticism and postmodern criticism.

 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.
Satisfies a Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor requirement.

 

COM 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= SOC 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies and Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

COM 225 Interpersonal Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

A theoretical, practical, and experiential study of the selective, systemic, and individual transactions that allow people to reflect and build personal knowledge of one another and create shared meaning. Readings, discussions, and exercises focus on connecting concepts and models to everyday interactions. Included are issues of diversity, personal identity, human perceptions, language use, mindful listening, conflict management, and nonverbal communication.

Satisfies a Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor requirement.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

COM 230 Organizational Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Study of how communication creates and sustains organizations and is coordinated and controlled to achieve collective outcomes. Such topics as leadership, globalization, workplace collaboration, diversity, and crisis communication will connect theoretical concepts and models to today's changing world.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.
Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

COM 275 Mass Media & Society (= SOC 275)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

This course takes a critical approach to the study of the production and consumption of mass media, focusing on both the media industry in the United States and emerging forms of global media. Drawing upon various media-including television, radio, video games, and the Internet-the course will examine the economic and social organization of mass media, the content of media messages, the relationship between media and the public, the growth of new media technologies, and current dilemmas facing media policy makers. The course assumes that mass media and the industries that produce media products play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies.

Major credit in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Minor in Communication Studies.
Satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.

COM 280 Intercultural Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

This course explores issues related to the intercultural communication process. We will consider the important role of context (social, cultural, and historical) in intercultural interactions. We will examine the complex relationship between culture and communication from three conceptual perspectives: the social psychological perspective, the interpretive perspective, and the critical perspective. It is through these three conceptual perspectives that we will strive towards a comprehensive picture of intercultural communication. From applying these approaches to the study of intercultural communication, we will also come to appreciate the complexity and dialectical tensions involved in intercultural interactions. This learning process should enhance self-reflection, flexibility, and sensitivity in intercultural communication which students will likely find useful whether interested in studying or working abroad or simply wanting to become better informed intercultural communicators in our increasingly diverse nation and world.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

COM 290 Persuasion and Propaganda
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hogan

Explores the distinction-theoretically, historically, and in contemporary public discourse- between persuasion and propaganda.  Surveys and provides background in the various meanings and applications of the terms persuasion and propaganda in theory and practice.  Through both scholarly research and case studies, it helps students become more sophisticated and critical consumers of persuasion and propaganda in the "marketplace of ideas." 

  • Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.
    Satisfies a Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
COM 315 Media Effects (= SOC 315)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

An exploration of relevant theories and practices of conducting media effects research in the mass mediated/disseminated communication contexts including television, radio, print, popular culture, internet, and other forms of new media. Topics include health, advertising, edutainment, stereotypes, violence, pornography, music videos, video games, news, and politics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies Communication Studies and Film and Media Studies interdisciplinary minor requirements.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

COM 328 Social Media's Impact on Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The oldest and most trusted form of human communication is word of mouth. The most developed and pervasive is mass media. Now comes social media, incorporating the qualities of both: word of mouth at the speed of light. Its existence is so new, its effects so stupefying, that few have paused from drinking it in long enough to contemplate how it works and where it is taking our world. Through this course, you will explore the underpinnings of social media, its widespread uses to date and the far-ranging effects those uses are having on culture, media, politics and business (often explained by visiting professionals in those fields). You will also complete a project that applies social media within your chosen field.

Satisfies a interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.
 

COM 350 Communication and Issues of Diversity
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

The U.S. population continues to become increasingly more diverse, and this increased diversity creates newer, greater challenges for organizations (including government, nonprofit, and corporate entities) as well as for individual communicators. How do our upbringing and biases shape the way we characterize, interact with, and talk about others? The focus of this course is to introduce students to issues of power, race, class, and gender, as related to communication theory and practice.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.

COM 365 Language as Social Action
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hillard

Those who wish to promote social change have typically relied on language, perhaps our most important symbolic resource, to help them to define problematic social and political practices and to argue for new policies. How have persons and groups mobilized linguistic resources in order to argue for social change in the United States? Rhetoric-the study of how public understandings are shaped, shared, and changed through the agency of language-has since ancient times guided speakers and writers in the production of persuasive discourses. The course will examine several episodes of sharp disagreement in American life where civic roles and the rights of citizens have been contested. Using a rhetorical lens, we will analyze primary documents (written and spoken discourses produced during these episodes) in order to understand and evaluate the ways in which groups with unequal power have struggled to define some significant part of their common experience.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

COM 390 Voices of Democracy: Great Speeches in U.S. History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hogan

Explores some of the most famous (and infamous) speeches and debates in U.S. history.   Beyond learning about great speeches in history, students will reflect on how, in a free society, speech functions as a mechanism for defining our identity, reconciling our political and cultural differences, and affecting political and social change.  Appropriate for students from all years and majors.   

 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.

Satisfies a Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor requirement.

COM 395 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Communication Studies 101 or 201 and permission of the instructor. (Fall and Spring)

Instructor 
Martinez

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member who determines the means of evaluation. Open to advanced students with special projects.

COM 495 Communication Theory and Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Students should have taken COM 101, COM 201, and at least three courses from one track in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor. COM 101 or one elective may be taken concurrently. Instructor's permission required.  (Spring)

Instructor
Martinez

The capstone course for the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.  The study of a variety of theories of communication as they frame questions and enable the discovery of answers.  Theories cover basic conceptions of the communication process in interpersonal, public, and mass communication.  These theories, and exemplary research growing from them, provide the basis for the investigation of key questions concerning processes of communication. The course culminates in a major project bringing together a variety of theoretical perspectives.  

DAN 101 Introduction to Dance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bory

An introduction to the discipline of dance studies, this primarily lecture/discussion course investigates dance as a cultural form and as an artistic, meaning-making system.  Through lectures, discussions, readings, video screenings, attendance at performances, critical writing, and occasional movement sessions, students will build a well-rounded, foundational understanding of major concepts and issues engaged in the study of various dance forms.  No previous dance experience is necessary. 

Students entering 2012 or after: satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Fine Arts distribution requirement.

DAN 282 Dance, Gender, & Sexuality
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bory

Through a transhistorical study of a various styles and forms, this lecture/discussion class examines a variety of issues around gender and sexuality illuminated in the staging, performance, and practice of dance. Understanding dance as a focused site for conceptualizing how bodies make meaning, this course explores the social and historical configuration of dancing bodies and dance's capacity to form and transform social identities. Course work includes readings, performance viewings, presentations, and written assignments.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in the Interpersonal/Intercultural track in Communication Studies

ENG 201 Professional Writing
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Campbell

This course explores techniques and types of professional writing, including developing a professional web presence and writing resumes, informational publications, and proposals common to for-profit, non-profit, and technical communities.  This course will emphasize the skills and concepts necessary to engage in professional writing contexts, including how to construct and manifest ethos (the writer's character) through careful document design, research strategies, and professional representation of self in print and digital enviornments and how to collaborate with others in subdividing and sequencing tasks with considerable research and writing components.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 285 Representations of HIV/AIDS (= BIO 263)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Fox, Wessner

(Cross-listed as Biology 263). What happens when literary critics and scientists converse? In this team-taught course, we will examine texts related to HIV/AIDS through the lens of the artist and the lens of the biologist.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

ENG 289 Environmental Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangrum

Overview of environmental literature from Thoreau to the present day.  Generally focuses on the enviornmental literature of the United States, but may include other English-language literature.  Designed for both majors and non-majors.


Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Enviornmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 293 Film as Narrative Art
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Kuzmanovich, Miller

This course explores the relationship of film video to other narrative media, with emphasis on authorship, genre, and the relationship of verbal and visual languages. Students will make a short video, but the course does not assume any production experience.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
 

ENG 310 The English Language
Prerequisites & Notes

 

 

Instructor 
Ford

Introduction to theories of modern linguistics as they illuminate the historical development of English phonology, morphology, and syntax from Old and Middle English to Modern English. Attends to both written and spoken English; examines definitions and theories of grammar, as well as attitudes toward language change in England and the U.S.  

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 388 Contemporary Theatre
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

388 Contemporary Theatre

Instructor
Fox

Despite our highly visual and multimedia age, we don't often think of the stage as being a site of significant cultural conversation.   Yet there is simply no substitute for the vitality and importance of live theater.  To paraphrase Edward Albee, theater puts the mirror up in front of an audience and asks them: "This is who you are. Now what are you going to do about it?"

This course will examine the origins and development of contemporary theatre in the Western tradition, post-1960, with an emphasis on American and British drama. We will particularly place a heavy emphasis on text-based drama of the last two decades, examining the ways in which recent theater has asked its audiences to contemplate issues of concern to contemporary life including (though not limited to) race in America; global violence against women; class division; and the commodification of human relations, both personal and international.  We will also discuss how theater challenges us to find creative solutions through connection, community, and claiming identity. No prior experience reading drama is necessary.

In the past, this course has included works by (but is not limited to): August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Quiara Alegría Hudes, Lynn Nottage, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins, Robert O'Hara, Adrienne Kennedy, Amiri Baraka​, Jez Butterworth, Tony Kushner, and Ayad Akhtar. 

Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 389 Posthumanism
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Mangrum

This course will reexamine the idea of "the human." Readings will be drawn from graphic novels, post-apocalyptic narratives, classical and contemporary theory, science fiction, and recent work in cultural and environmental criticism. Through our reading, we will reconsider the distinctions between humans, nonhumans, and the idea of the natural. The often-porous borders between species, technologies, and environments will also allow us to ask questions about the future of the humanities. If we unsettle prevailing assumptions about the meaning of "the human," what will the humanities look like in the coming decades? What is the future of humanistic study in an age when digital technologies have become a common feature of everyday life and environmental crises pose existential threats to the planet and our species?

In order to reconsider what we mean when we talk about "the human," we will need to trek across diverse intellectual terrain. We'll consider narratives that imagine a future continuum of human-cyborgs, reflect on vast spatial-temporal scales that call into question the significance of our species, probe the assumptions about race and gender underlying popular American ideas about nature, and evaluate scenarios in which the natural becomes "uncanny" even as the technological becomes "organic."

The course will require three seminar-style projects, regular engagement in discussion, and a final class assignment in which students imagine the future shape, practices, and concerns of the humanities. 


Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENG 393 Studies in Literature and the Visual Arts: A: Film Genres or B: Love and Art or C: Film Theory or D: Word Art
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required.

Studies in Literature and the Visual Arts

Instructor

Varies

 

393A-C Satisfy the Visual and Performing Arts distribution.
Check schedule to determine which section is being offered.
 

393A Film Genres

Instructor
Kuzmanovich

Originally a means of market differentiation, film genres now are sets of conventions with emotional payoffs, that is, formal devices that promise "repetitive reaffirmation of certain ritualistic experiences" (Gehring).  In other words, film genres are about business, art, and technology.  But they seem to me also about ways of creating or recreating emotions.  In this course we'll look at the formal and psychological markers as well as cultural consequences of a number of film genres that create, recreate, and thus keep certain emotions in circulation. 


393B Love and Art

Instructor
Kuzmanovich

This is not a course in which we parade our pain or give advice to the lovelorn. But it is an immodest and wholly foolish undertaking.  And an ambitious one, too:  though it's mostly literary analysis it is also part philosophy, part psychology, part history, part film theory, part creative writing and filmmaking.  For to begin to speak of love is to speak of desire, beauty, goodness, creation, immortality (Plato), psychic anatomy and anatomical memory, prophetic dreams, conscious irrationality, obsession, transgression, suffering, repression, sublimation (Freud), selfhood, otherness, will to power, slavery, mastery, surrender (Hegel, Sartre, De Beauvoir), prostitution (Marx and Engels), male conspiracy (Firestone),   Lines between  eros, philia, nomos, agape, and theoria grow faint and not only because they happen to be Greek words and thus equally strange. Appetites sometimes merge and sometimes squabble with reason and spirit.  Loving oneself, loving others, loving God, loving God in others, passion, intimacy, commitment, these states bring up only the first questions: Who/what should be loved? How does a lover choose a/the beloved? What causes love? What does love cause? Egotism? Idealism? Self-knowledge? Marriage? Companionate marriage? Partnership? The sense that the lovers are heroes/heroines of their own stories which they can finally tell? If one's love is a story, or becomes a story, what is the genre of that story? Does love become a story only in love's absence? Is love good? Is love a good? Is there a hierarchy of loves and lovers? What connects love to sexual desire? Do causes and connections differ among cultures and historical periods? What differentiates falling in love from being or staying in love? All of these are good philosophical questions and psychological categories, but talking about love philosophically or treating it as something amenable to psychologizing invariably causes us, as the philosopher Arthur Danto said in the Chambers Gallery, "to lose touch with the reality everyone cherishes."


393C Film Theory

Instructor
Miller

This course explores theoretical approaches to fiction and nonfiction film, television, video and other media. Though no production experience is required, we will make short storyboards  and videos, and students have the option to make a video as a final project. We then consider "ists" and "isms," including realism and reality TV; modernism; postmodernism; materialism; evolutionary criticism, and Freudianism and gender theory. Movies we may consider: Modern Times, Pervert's Guide to Cinema, Bicycle Thieves, Star Wars, Shane, Out of the Past, Waking Life,No Country for Old Men, Man with the Movie Camera, Un Chien Andalou, and a variety of shorter videos.


393D Word Art

Instructor
Churchill

You live in a highly visual culture.  To be literate, you need to read and interpret words, images & the interplay between them, both in print and online. This course examines print & digital texts that combine words & images, but it is not a course in mass communications. Instead, we'll study some of the most complex and subtle word/image interactions, including ekphrasis (poems about pictures), illuminated books, graphic memoir, and digital poetry. ENG 393: Word-Art is a double hybrid: a study of words & images via critical & creative writing. The course inhabits both print and digital realms: meet in a classroom & blog on this website; draw in notebooks & write for web publication; hack print books & design a Davidson Domain.

FMS 220 Introduction to Film and Media Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructors
Lerner, McCarthy

An introduction to the history and analysis of screen media, with an emphasis on film (feature films, documentaries, animation, and experimental) together with an examination of ways cinematic techniques of storytelling do and do not find their ways into later media like television and video games. Lectures and discussions supplemented by theoretical readings and weekly screenings.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
Required course for fulfilling the Film and Media Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.

FMS 321 Interactive Digital Narratives
Prerequisites & Notes

FMS 220 or ENG 293.

Instructor
Lerner

A close study of selected video games using an interdisciplinary blend of methodologies culled from cultural studies, film and media studies theory, literary criticism, and history.

Film and Media Studies Interdisciplinary Minor Credit.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

GER 346 Memory on Film (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Examines personal and collective memory in a variety of cultural contexts and the strategies that film and literature use to represent it. We will also analyze the roles that truth-telling, trauma and national narratives play in memory's construction. From the German context, we will look specifically at cultural and social memory in understanding Germany's twentieth-century history. More generally, and in light of James Frey's controversial autobiography, we will examine general assumptions around memory and the extent to which it can be accurately rendered.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

HIS 245 Digital History of Early American Knowledge
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Shrout

This course explores communication technologies and knowledge production in the antebellum United States, while introducing students to newer methods afforded by digital studies.  By the end of the course, students will understand how people parsed information, talked, wrote, and signaled one another in the past. They will also understand how new tools help us to communicate both with other scholars and with the public today.  Throughout the course they will engage in formal historical writing - historiography, primary source analysis, historical interpretation - as well as with the new opportunities for public engagement afforded by digital history.

We will examine both elite and non-elite modes of knowledge production and transmission, and how communication was used both to exert power and as a form of resistance.  Over the course of the semester, students will engage with primary sources, historical monographs and popular culture representations of communication and knowledge production in America's past.

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement

Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement

Satisfied an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies

HIS 255 American Popular Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Aldridge

American popular culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include sports, popular music, theatre, motion pictures and television. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.

HIS 358 Civil Rights Wars, Civil Rights Warriors
Prerequisites & Notes

Spring

Instructor
Staff

An oral history-based course that examines the lawyers and litigants who, in the 1960s and 1970s, accepted personal and financial risk to challenge Jim Crow laws.  Students will interview and videotape the courageous lawyers, prepare a video documentary.  Research essays on current civil rights topics as well.

HIS 364 Gender and History in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

Women's and men's experiences and how gender roles have shaped the social and political history of Latin America. Themes include conquest encounters, elite and religious notions of gender propriety, labor roles, and political activism. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 427 European Consumer Culture: 1750 to the Present
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Tilburg

The history and historiography of consumer culture in Europe from the 18th century through the 1980s.  The lens of consumerism reveals the momentous economic, social, and political transformations of the modern era, up to and including the controversial process of "Americanization" following World War II. 

HIS 451 African American Cultural History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Aldridge

A study of African American cultural history with particular focus on the 20th century. Specific artistic and cultural forms studied may include the visual arts, music, dance, film, and television in their historical context.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

MUS 228 Film Music
Prerequisites & Notes

No music training required. (Not offered in 2016-17.)

Instructor
Lerner

Historical, stylistic, and analytic study of film music from the origins of cinema in the 1890s to the present, focusing on fictional Hollywood narratives while also considering music's function in documentary and avant-garde filmmaking. Emphasizes close reading of music in relation to film, and vice versa.  Weekly screenings.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement. 

PHI 102 Reason and Argument
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor 
McKeever

Introduction to reasoning with a focus on the nature and evaluation of arguments, the identification of fallacies, and the rules of rational discourse.

Satisfies the philosophy major requirement of either PHI 102 or PHI 200.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

Counts as an elective in the Public Communication/Rhetoric Track of the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.

POL 121 American Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to juniors until drop-add; not open to seniors except with permission of the instructor and only once the semester begins.

Instructors
Bullock, O'Geen, Roberts

Analysis of American political processes, institutions, and problems.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

 

POL 222 Parties and Interest Groups
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Roberts

Analysis of the internal operation of parties and interest groups and their role in the American electoral and legislative process.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

 

POL 223 The Presidency
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
O'Geen, Roberts

The modern American presidency from a policy-making perspective, including consideration of the various internal and external factors that constrain the behavior of incumbent presidents.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

 

POL 328 Politics of Information
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bullock

Ratings, rankings and certifications have become a ubiquitous form of power in American society.  Through in-depth case studies, this course explores the validity, credibility and effectiveness of these hotly-contested "information-based governance" strategies (such as food sustainability certifications, corporate "green" rankings, or doctor quality ratings), particularly in the health and environmental fields.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

 

POL 330 Campaign Strategy
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Roberts

Analysis of the strategic and ethical dilemmas that political candidates face in election campaigns.

 

POL 334 Public Opinion
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered alternate years.)

Instructors
Staff


Formation, change and measurement of political attitudes.

 

POL 398 Global Environmental Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Offered every other year, in rotation with POL 228.

Instructor
Bullock

Through in-depth case studies and research projects, this course introduces students to comparative and international perspectives on three major environmental challenges - climate change, biodiversity loss, and access to clean water.  Students will learn about the strengths and limitations of efforts by both governmental and non-governmental actors across a range of different countries and scales to tackle these challenges. 

Satisfies a major requirement in Political Science

Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

PSY 232 Social Psychology
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor 
Good

An overview of how thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors are shaped by social and situational factors. Topics include: the social self, attitude formation and change, person perception, cultural influences, conformity, communication processes and persuasion, group processes, prejudice, aggression, cooperation-competition, and real-world applications of social psychology. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 260 Organization Development
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101 required; Psychology 254 recommended but not required.

Instructor
Kello

Organization Development (OD) is a multi-disciplinary area of research and practice that deals with the understanding and application of the principles of behavioral science to planned organizational change. 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

REL 360 American Civil Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

 

Instructor
Wills

Examination of the many ways that the United States serves as a focus for religious energies-for rituals, creeds, and myths that organize our lives and explain us to ourselves as a national community. Topics may include landscape, family, education, holidays and electoral politics as civil religious institutions.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 365 Women in American Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wills

Using biographies and autobiographies of women from various periods and traditions of American religion, this course will explore women's roles in those traditions and the conventions through which those women have been portrayed.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

 

SOC 205 Racial and Ethnic Relations
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

Comparative and historical study of social processes related to racial and ethnic differences in modern complex societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal distribution of power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.  
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 217 Gender and Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course introduces a critical approach to examining the social construction of gender. It explores several different perspectives on gender inequality and the role of social institutions such as family, education, economy, and media in creating the experience of gender in society.

Satisfies the Gender Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= COM 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include: culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender Studies and Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor. 

 

SOC 231 Leadership & Organizations
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

Leaders, teams, and organizations are closely intertwined in the operations of social institutions, social structures, and social processes.  The course provides an introduction to models and theories of leadership, processes inherent in the dynamics of small group interactions, and critical insights from organizational theory.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 240 Social Movements
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An introduction to social movements as distinctive social spaces in which relatively powerless groups of people make collective efforts to affect history.  Explores the major sociological approaches to studying these efforts, as well as the dynamics of social movement emergence, goals and messages, tactics and strategies, organization structures, internal conflicts, and activist identity formation.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 275 Mass Media & Society (= COM 275)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

This course takes a critical approach to the study of the production and consumption of mass media, focusing on both the media industry in the United States and emerging forms of global media. Drawing upon various media - including television, radio, video games, and the Internet - the course will examine the economic and social organization of mass media, the content of media messages, the relationship between media and the public, the growth of new media technologies, and current dilemmas facing media policy makers. The course assumes that mass media and the industries that produce media products play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies.

Major credit in Sociology.
Counts toward the Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.

SOC 300 Education in African American Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century. We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society.

SOC 310 Gender, Race, and Sports
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman


In this course, we will examine the interrelations between gender, race, and sports. We will view sports through a sociological lens and consider how sports are shaped by and in turn shape social interaction. We will focus on how sports influence our definitions of masculinity and femininity, the opportunities and obstacles sports provide for members of different racial/ethnic and gender groups, and the images associated with race, gender, and sports. We consider why certain sports are associated with certain races, how sport is used to prove masculinity, experiences of gay athletes, Title IX and issues of gender segregation, the politics of gender verification, sports as an opportunity for upward mobility, exploitation in college sports, racial position segregation in college football, sports and violence, the criminalization of black masculinity in sports, mascots and racial imagery, and representations of race and gender in sports media.

 Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies Major and Minor, Africana Studies Major and Minor, and Social Science Thought.

SOC 315 Media Effects (= COM 315)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

An exploration of relevant theories and practices of conducting media effects research in the mass mediated/disseminated communication contexts including television, radio, print, popular culture, internet, and other forms of new media. Topics include health, advertising, edutainment, stereotypes, violence, pornography, music videos, video games, news, and politics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies Communication Studies and Film and Media Studies interdisciplinary minor requirements.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

SOC 331 Theoretical Explorations of Community Engagement
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Riemer

An examination of community engagement through a range of theoretical lenses. After interrogating constructions of "community," "service," and "civic engagement," we will explore the ways in which topics such as social justice, civic engagement, empowerment, diversity, and the ethics of service frame community work. Specific enactments of community involvement are explored including philanthropy, volunteerism, social entrepreneurship, and activism with a focus on leadership and change.

Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

THE 362 Theatre for Social Justice
Prerequisites & Notes

Meets for extra hours; please consult with the instructor.

Instructor
Green

Course investigates the potential for theatre and performance to be catalysts for social change. Focusing on Community-Based Theatre, the course explores ways in which performance has participated in struggles against oppression and has been integral to community-building. Course combines case studies from various historical and geographical contexts with practical activities used by Community-Based Theatre practitioners.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.