Educational Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 371 Critical Race Theory (=EDU 371, =SOC 371)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor:
Kelly

This course introduces students to the development of critical race theory as a specific theoretical framework to explain or to investigate how race and racism are organized and operate within the United States.  The course will have a sociological focus with emphasis on critical race scholarship that includes, but is not limited to, an analysis of double consciousness, colorblindness, intersectionality, whiteness as property, racial microaggressions, and structures of power.  Students will also explore central tenets and key writings advanced in the 1990s primarily by African American, Latino/a, and Asian American scholars in law, education, and public policy.  The course is both reading intensive and extensive with a major writing assignment that addresses a theoretical problem that grows out of the course topics and discussions. 

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and Africana Studies.
Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 121 History of Educational Theory and Practice
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall and Spring)

Instructors
Gay, Kelly

Traces historical development and underlying philosophies of educational institutions and practices in the United States; considers current roles and functions of the school in relation to other social institutions.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

EDU 131 Schools, Cinema, and American Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This course explores how "school films" have become authoritative texts on what counts as good education.  We will examine how students, educators, and school communities are represented in film, particularly in regard to race, nation, class, gender, sexuality, and disability.  We will interrogate implicit assumptions and hidden messages in cinematic portrayals of school life with a focus on teachers' lives, work and careers.  We will re-imagine the cinematic role in shaping educational practices, policies, and law.  Students will write analytical papers and complete a major research project.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

EDU 141 Introduction to Philosophy of Education
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Gay

A study of classic and contemporary documents in Philosophy of Education. Includes readings, discussions, and analyses of approximately twenty different philosophers from the fifth century BCE to the twenty-first century.

 

Satisfies Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

EDU 210 Inclusive Education: An Intergroup Dialogue on Race
Prerequisites & Notes

This course is by permission only and a pre-registration survey must be completed before the instructors determine the final class roster.

Instructor
Kim, T. Foley

This course is based on the intergroup dialogue model where two facilitators of differing social identity groups encourage dialogue among class members about persistent social issues and conflicts related to race, racism, and its intersections with other social identities such as class, gender, sexual orientation, religion and immigration/migration background.  The intergroup dialogue approach to teaching about race and racism in the United States is pedagogically unique. The class is balanced with approximately half of the students self-identifying as White and the other half identifying as Students of Color or racial minorities in the United States and at Davidson College. Classroom diversity, balance and size is critical for building the trust and safety necessary for a racially diverse class to deeply engage the topic of race and multicultural education as a practice. Through interactive activities, in-class dialogues, course readings, and self-reflective writing assignments, students will learn about important issues and perspectives facing the participating populations on campus and in the United States. This course is by permission only and a pre-registration survey must be completed before the instructors determine the final class roster.


Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

EDU 221 Schools and Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Gay, Kelly

What really constitutes school success?  Is a liberal education the best education?  Do teachers treat children from different backgrounds unfairly?  What aspects of society do schools reproduce?  These are some of the questions that students will examine in this introductory course on contemporary educational theory and practice in schools.  Students will build an understanding of major social theories that have shaped their thinking about educational problems.  In addition, students will construct and reconstruct their own theoretical perspective to educational trends and debates in the United States.   

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 

EDU 241 Child Development (= PSY 241)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101. (Fall)

Instructor 
Leyva

(Cross-listed as Psychology 241.) Research and theory on the cognitive, socio-emotional and physical changes in development from prenatal through middle childhood.  Emphasis on how culture shapes child development and applications to educational settings.  Four-hour observations at an after-school program are required.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 
 

EDU 242 Educational Psychology (= PSY 242)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2015-16.)

Instructor
Staff

This course focuses on issues in learning and development that have particular relevance to understanding students in classrooms, schools, and school communities.  Topics include, but are not limited to: child and adolescent development, learning, motivation, information processing and evaluation, the exceptional child, and cultural differences.

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

EDU 243 Adolescent Development (= PSY 243)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed as Psychology 243.)  An in-depth examination of specific theories, concepts, and methods related to the period of adolescence. Students will explore a wide range of topics including: cognitive development, moral development, identity formation, gender role, social relationships, and the effects of culture on adolescent development.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 250 Multicultural Education
Prerequisites & Notes


 

Instructor
Staff

This course examines the ways in which schools and society in the United States engage with diverse individuals and groups, as well as how obstacles to ever-increasing multiculturalism are rooted in behaviors, assumptions, values, thinking and communication styles.  The course will be taught using the intergroup dialogue model where two facilitators of differing social identity groups encourage dialogue among students about persistent social issues and conflicts related to race, racism, and the intersections of class, gender, sexual orientation, religion and immigration/migration background.  The intergroup dialogue approach to teaching multicultural education is pedagogically unique.  The class is balanced with approximately half of the students self-identifying as White and the other half identifying as Students of Color or racial minorities in the United States and at Davidson College.


Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 

EDU 260 Oppression & Education (=SOC 261)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

(Cross-listed as SOC 261.) This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

EDU 270 Democracy and Education
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Gay

Democracy and Education examines philosophical and theoretical positions which contend that education is a public good and is essential to the cultivation of a democratic civil society. Through critical analysis and scrutiny, students investigate the notion that public schooling in the United States should be based on principles of equitable access and that every individual has a right to educational opportunities which are just, fair, and democratic.  


Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

EDU 280 Introduction to Educational Policy
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Adnot

This course is designed to introduce students to current issues in educational policy, and help them develop rigorous policy analysis skills. We will examine the goals, institutions, and actors that shape the American K-12 education system in order to understand recent reform efforts and their consequences for students.  Our inquiry will be grounded in seminal theories of the policy process such as agenda setting (Kingdon & Thurber, 1984), power (Lukes, 1974), and the advocacy coalition framework (Sabatier, 1988). Too much of the public discourse on education is polarized by reflexive reactions to particular policy proposals, whereas rigorous policy analysis lies in understanding the details of specific proposals and using conceptual models and strong evidence to evaluate their potential impact on educational stakeholders.

The primary goal of this course is to develop students' ability to engage current education policy debates using systematic and rigorous methods. As such, a substantial portion of the course will require that students apply theories of the policy process and tools of policy analysis to specific reforms such as the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the Common Core State Standards, teacher workforce policies, and the growing presence of charter schools, especially in urban areas.  Students will engage these topics through in-class discussions, case studies, presentations, and through the creation of work products such as policy memos, issue briefs, and op-ed articles.

Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in the CIS major in Educational Studies & Public Policy Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies.

EDU 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Kelly, Christian-Lamb

In this hands-on methods course, students will build interdisciplinary research skills focused on the theory and practice of oral history.  We will explore the theories, methods, and debates surrounding one of the oldest research tools: oral testimony.  Students will learn to critically evaluate oral sources and use oral histories in conjunction with other forms of research.  Students will engage with the practical aspects of oral history by completing and transcribing two oral history interviews.  In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of individual and collective memory and the questions that both raise for writing oral history.  Each student will participate in a class oral history project.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology

Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Educational Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement

 

EDU 291 Data in Education
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Adnot

Educational data and quantitative data analyses have come to play a powerful role in the way we govern our schools. In this course, students will learn to be critical consumers and skilled producers of such analyses. In the applied portion of this class, students will learn data management, analysis, and visualization strategies by working with real data gathered in educational settings to answer research questions of policy and practical interest.


Satisfies a requirement in the Eduational Studies minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Digital Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies a Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 301 Independent Study in Education
Prerequisites & Notes

Requires approval of the instructor.

Instructor
Staff

Areas of study vary according to educational objectives and preferences of interested students. Includes experiences in school settings (public or private) and any level (elementary or secondary) for any subject. The independent study is under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study and evaluates the student's work.

EDU 302 Field Placement in Education
Prerequisites & Notes

Requires approval of the instructor.

Instructor
Staff 

Areas of study and experience vary according to the faculty member's educational objectives and preferences. Requires approximately eight hours per week in a formal or nonformal school setting, weekly meetings with faculty member and peers, and production of a digital portfolio that synthesizes the completed minor courses.

EDU 320 Growing up Jim Crow
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow.  Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
 

EDU 330 Sociology of Education (=SOC 330)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Kelly

(Cross-listed as SOC 330.) An introduction to the sociological study of education in the United States, including an examination of the school as an organization within a larger environment. Explores the link between schools and social stratification by analyzing the mutually generative functions of schools and considers how processes within schools can lead to different outcomes for stakeholders.

Provides major credit in Sociology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

EDU 340 Education in African American Society (=SOC 340)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Kelly
(Cross-listed as SOC 340.) This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century.  We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society.  Students will write a seminar paper and complete a midterm and final review. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a major credit in Sociology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 




 

EDU 350 Latino(a) Education in the United States
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This course will examine the schooling experiences and educational attainment of Latinos & Latinas in the United States.  We will explore the impact of culture, gender, class, and immigration on Latino/a educational experiences, as well as the impact structures and settings, activism and advocacy, and politics and economics can have on educational attainment.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 360 Seminar in Second Language Acquisition
Prerequisites & Notes

Students must have fulfilled Davidson's foreign language requirement or its equivalent before enrolling in the course.

Instructor
Fernández, Koo

This course provides an introduction to second language acquisition theories and research, exploring the limits and possibilities of instructed and natural contexts. Topics include the nature of language, the role of the native language, second language acquisition universals, theoretical and pedagogical approaches, nonlanguage influences, instructed second language learning, and linguistic data analysis. Students will engage in critical discussions of the readings and observations of foreign/second language classes, and either produce a research-based instructional intervention or linguistic fieldwork analysis.

 

Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 361 Bilingualism, literacy and schooling
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fernández

In this seminar course, we will devote time inside of class and in our local community to the study of bilingualism and literacy development in immigrant school-aged children and youth. Although we will focus on teaching English literacy to students, we will consider ways to do so that honor students' home languages and cultures. We will meet one afternoon per week (Tuesdays, 1:40-4:20pm) to discuss theoretical and practice-oriented research literature.  Students will also be required to commit either Mondays or Wednesdays (3:30-4:20) to tutoring ELLs at Cornelius Elementary School.  Although not required, a background in second language acquisition, psychology, and/or sociology is recommended.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

Satisfies the Cultural diversity requirement

EDU 370 War, Peace, & Education
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Gay

War, Peace, and Education confronts the complex relationship most Americans have with war by detecting components of the hidden curriculum in schools that serve to endorse war.  The course will focus on five such components:  masculinity and hero worship, patriotism, hatred, religion's frequent support of war, and war as an arena for supplying existential meaning.

 

Satisfies the Philosophical & Religious Perspectives distribution requirement

EDU 371 Critical Race Theory (=SOC 371, =AFR 371)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor:
Kelly

This course introduces students to the development of critical race theory as a specific theoretical framework to explain or to investigate how race and racism are organized and operate within the United States.  The course will have a sociological focus with emphasis on critical race scholarship that includes, but is not limited to, an analysis of double consciousness, colorblindness, intersectionality, whiteness as property, racial microaggressions, and structures of power.  Students will also explore central tenets and key writings advanced in the 1990s primarily by African American, Latino/a, and Asian American scholars in law, education, and public policy.  The course is both reading intensive and extensive with a major writing assignment that addresses a theoretical problem that grows out of the course topics and discussions. 

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and Africana Studies.
Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 380 Evaluating Educational Innovations for Youth
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Adnot

This course will survey selected social innovations aimed at improving social and educational outcomes for youth, and introduce students to theoretical and empirical approaches to assessing the effectiveness of innovations. Following the Center for Social Innovation at Stanford's Graduate School of Business, a social innovation is defined as "a novel solution to a social problem that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or just than present solutions and for which the value created accrues primarily to society as a whole rather than private individuals." Examples of innovations include novel programs like Communities in Schools and new approaches to learning like Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs). We will also explore the role of philanthropy and venture capital in generating and sustaining innovation efforts.

Through the course, students will understand the evaluative needs of different stages of innovation, learn to connect appropriate research designs, and become critical consumers of research that examines social and educational innovation. Course participants will also have the opportunity to interact with local and national social entrepreneurs through a series of in-person and remote guest lectures. In addition, students will engage in intensive case study of select social innovations, and design an evaluation plan for a new or existing innovation. Finally, the course will seek to integrate applicable programming from Davidson's Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative as well.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in the CIS major Educational Studies & Public Policy Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies.

ENG 231 Young Adult Fiction
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Campbell

Ever wonder what would move people to forbid, burn, even stab books? Come explore this question in Young Adult Literature. In this course, we will consider YA fiction from both various critical perspectives and within various educational contexts. Over the semester, we will review a brief history of the genre; examine a range of contemporary young adult fiction; discuss the purposes of and controversies about teaching such works in middle and high school contexts; and do research on case studies in which specific texts have been contested. By semester's end, students will know much about how literature works-and is presumed to work-in and on contemporary American society. 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

HHV 244 Child Psychopathology (=EDU 234 and PSY 234)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)
PSY 101

Instructor 
Stutts

An overview of the psychological disorders of childhood, including their description, classification, etiology, assessment and treatment.  Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and empirical bases of these disorders, focusing on relevant research methods and findings as well as case history material. 
Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Educational Studies minor credit.

Health and Human Services interdisciplinary minor credit.

Psychology Major credit (Clinical column)

POL 305 Education and Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ahrensdorf

This course examines the proper political and moral education of aspiring leaders in works by Plato, Machiavelli, and Shakespeare.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

 

PSY 232 Social Psychology
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor 
Good

An overview of how thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors are shaped by social and situational factors. Topics include: the social self, attitude formation and change, person perception, cultural influences, conformity, communication processes and persuasion, group processes, prejudice, aggression, cooperation-competition, and real-world applications of social psychology. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 234 Child Psychopathology (=HHV 244 and EDU 234)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)
PSY 101

Instructor 
Stutts

An overview of the psychological disorders of childhood, including their description, classification, etiology, assessment and treatment.  Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and empirical bases of these disorders, focusing on relevant research methods and findings as well as case history material. 
Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Educational Studies minor credit.

Health and Human Services interdisciplinary minor credit.

Psychology Major credit (Clinical column)
 

PSY 241 Child Development (=EDU 241)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Leyva

(Cross-listed as Educational Studies 241.)  Research and theory on the cognitive, socio-emotional and physical changes in development from prenatal through middle childhood.  Emphasis on how culture shapes child development and applications to educational settings.   Four-hour observations at an after-school program are required.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 243 Adolescent Development (= EDU 243)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor 
Staff

(Cross-listed as Educational Studies 243.) An in-depth examination of specific theories, concepts, and methods related to the period of adolescence. Students will explore a wide range of topics including: cognitive development, moral development, identity formation, gender role, social relationships, and the effects of culture on adolescent development. 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 282 Learning
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructors
Ramirez, Smith

Overview of major topics in learning: elicitation, classical conditioning, reinforcement, punishment, problem solving, behavioral economics, and verbal behavior. Focus on empirical data, research methodology, and technologies generated from learning research.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 330 Sociology of Education (=EDU 330)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

An introduction to the sociological study of education in the United States, including an examination of the school as an organization within a larger environment. Explores the link between schools and social stratification by analyzing the mutually generative functions of schools and considers how processes within schools can lead to different outcomes for stakeholders.

Satisfies the Education Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SOC 331 Theoretical Explorations of Community Engagement
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Riemer

An examination of community engagement through a range of theoretical lenses. After interrogating constructions of "community," "service," and "civic engagement," we will explore the ways in which topics such as social justice, civic engagement, empowerment, diversity, and the ethics of service frame community work. Specific enactments of community involvement are explored including philanthropy, volunteerism, social entrepreneurship, and activism with a focus on leadership and change.

Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 371 Critical Race Theory (= AFR 371 and EDU 371)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Introduces students to the development of critical race theory as a specific theoretical framework to explain or to investigate how race and racism are organized and operate within the United States.  The course will have a sociological focus with emphasis on critical race scholarship that includes, but is not limited to, an analysis of double consciousness, colorblindness, intersectionality, whiteness as property, racial microaggressions, and structures of power.  Students will also explore central tenets and key writings advanced in the 1990s primarily by African American, Latino/a, and Asian American scholars in law, education, and public policy.  The course is both reading intensive and extensive with a major writing assignment that addresses a theoretical problem that grows out of the course topics and discussions.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SPA 311 Teaching Spanish in the Elementary School
Prerequisites & Notes

SPA 260 or equivalent required. Students concurrently enrolled in SPA 260 are eligible.
(Fall 2016)

Instructor
Kietrys

In this course, students will read theoretical material about language learning and language pedagogy as specifically related to children learning Spanish as a foreign language and put the readings into practice through participation in the Davidson FLES (Foreign Language in the Elementary School) program. Students will learn how to plan a curriculum, develop lesson plans, implement lessons, and assess their students' learning. Teaching in the  Davidson FLES is required. Conducted in Spanish with readings in English and Spanish; counts toward the Major and Minor in Hispanic Studies.