German Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
GER 101 Elementary German I
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Ellis

For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Each course requires online work and participation in AT sessions.

GER 102 Elementary German II
Prerequisites & Notes

German 101 or placement. (Spring)

Instructors
Denham, McCarthy

For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Each course requires online work and participation in AT sessions.

GER 103 Intensive Elementary German (2 credits)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Staff

For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Requires online work and participation in AT sessions. Meets six class hours per week. [Equivalent to German 101 and 102, counting for two courses.]

GER 201 Intermediate German
Prerequisites & Notes

German 102, 103, or placement. (Fall)

Instructor
McCarthy
 
Continuing work in developing language skills, with strong emphasis on speaking and writing. The course requires online work and participation in AT sessions.

Fulfills the foreign language requirement.

GER 230 German Literary Masterpieces (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. (Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

This course offers students an overview of some of the major authors and works of German literature that are significant (1) in their own right, (2) for the German literary tradition, and (3) because of their relationship to English and American literature. We will explore a variety of periods (Enlightenment, Romanticism, Poetic Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism) and genres (drama, novella, novel, opera, poetry, and film).

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 231 Special Literary Topics (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include Berlin Stories and Histories, Goethe and Schiller, Faust, Modern German Theater, Narrative Theory, the Novella, Genius in Literature.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 232 Burning Books (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Henke

Would the six million Jews have lived had the estimated 100 million books not been destroyed? What is it about books that suggests such a link to the human condition? Using the 1933 book burnings as its point of departure, this course explores the nature of literature in the context of the Third Reich. As you learn about Nazi Germany and the imaginary, and literary resistance to it, you will also be introduced to some basic methods of literary criticism. The end of the course is devoted to literary representations of the Holocaust.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 240 German for Economics and Policy
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in German. German 201 or the equivalent.

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Denham

This advanced intermediate language course provides an introduction to the economic and political structures in Germany and the EU. Covered topics include the history and current state of the most important political structures (parties, governmental structures in Germany and Europe), economic structures (trade agreements, finance, corporate and business structures), the role of the press and political foundations and non-governmental think thanks, and the transatlantic relationship. The course involves case studies: small groups of students will coordinate with a local German (or Swiss or Austrian) company in the Charlotte region and do an in-depth study of the company in the context of the course; this involves on-site visits and interviews and networking with German business leaders. The course culminates with a student-designed Davidson German Business Forum: a symposium and poster session in which students present their case studies with the German business leaders present. The course offers intensive work in German in the course topics. Taught in German. Prerequisite: German 201 or the equivalent.

 

Satisfies a major requirement in German Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in German Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in International Studies

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement

Fulfills the foreign language requirement

GER 241 Special Cultural Topics (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss culture. Covers various aspects of culture and society, such as history, politics, economics, literature, film, art and architecture, music, and mass media. Sample topics include The Holocaust and Vienna at the Turn of the Century.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 242 Hollywood Alternatives, From Germany and Beyond (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring 2017)

Instructor
McCarthy

This course offers a sampling of historical and contemporary attempts to challenge Hollywood's dominant cinematic codes. We will watch films from the Weimar Republic and "New German Cinema" of the 1970s, as well as Russian montage, French New Wave, "art house" cinema of the 1960s, independent film of the 1990s, plus several contemporary films.  Directors include: F.W. Murnau, Maya Deren, Luis Bunuel, Jean-Luc Godard, Michelangelo Antonioni, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Wim Wenders, Michael Hanecke, Todd Haynes, David Lynch, Sally Potter, Terrence Malick, and Kathryn Bigelow.  Students will write short essays and one longer research paper and also have the opportunity to make their own short experimental films. 

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

GER 243 Special Topics in Film (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

GER 243 Gender in Film topic counts towards the Gender and Sexuality Studies major.

Instructor
McCarthy

Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film that introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Classes focus on close readings and discussions.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

 

 

GER 250 Introduction to German Literary Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

German 201 or placement. (Spring)

Instructor
Ellis
An introduction to authors, genres, and periods in German literature as well as methods of literary criticism. Close reading, discussion, and analytical writing in German about key original texts from various periods and traditions.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 251 Special Literary Topics
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include the Bildungsroman, crime fiction, Theory of Drama, Literature as Resistance, Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertolt Brecht.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

GER 260 Introduction to German Cultural Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

German 201 or placement. (Fall)

Instructor
Denham

Close attention to the various answers to the questions: "Was ist Deutsch?" and "What does the study of German culture entail?" Texts drawn from various discourses, including history, literature, film, visual arts, political and social science, as well as journalism and popular culture.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 261 Special Cultural Topics
Prerequisites & Notes

German 260 or permission of the instructor.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Ellis

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss culture. Covers various aspects of culture and society, such as history, politics, economics, literature, film, art and architecture, music, and mass media. Sample topics include German Mass Media, Terrorism in Germany, the Afro-German Experience.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 263 Special Topics in Film
Prerequisites & Notes

German 201 or placement test.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film which introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Sample topics include an overview of German cinema, as well as German popular film. Classes are taught in German and focus on close readings and discussions.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

GER 270 Contemporary Germany
Prerequisites & Notes

German 201 or placement.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Examination of contemporary life in Germany. Texts include current newspapers and magazines, supplemented by video and film. Emphasis on composition and conversation. Strongly recommended for students planning to study in Germany.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 298 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor and the department chair. (Fall and Spring)

Instructor
Staff

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student's work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student's accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements.

GER 331 Special Literary Topics (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include Berlin Stories and Histories, Goethe and Schiller, Faust, Modern German Theater, Narrative Theory, the Novella, Genius in Literature.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 332 Modernism (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Denham

An interdisciplinary study in English of modernist movements in Central Europe between 1890 and 1940. Topics covered include literary movements (Naturalism, Expressionism, New Realism); artistic movements (Blue Rider, the Bridge, Jugendstil, Neue Sachlichkeit, Bauhaus); music (Neo-Romanticism, Second Viennese School, Jazz); culture and politics (Freud, fascism, urbanism, film, anti-Semitism). Some key figures include: Kandinsky, Klee, Gropius, Rilke, Kafka, Luxemburg, Modersohn-Becker, Th. Mann, Musil, Döblin, Nietzsche, Lasker-Schüler, Hitler, Riefenstahl, Trakl, R. Strauss, Torberg, Jünger.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 341 Borderland Europe: Cultural Productions on the Move
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ellis

Framed by the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe, this course will engage with contemporary and historical discourses of borders, migration, and belonging in Europe through the lens of cultural production. By examining key developments since WWII - including post-colonial migration, guest-worker programs, the end of the Cold War, and the rise of the European Union - we will situate current debates within a longer historical trajectory. Looking at films by Stephen Frears and Fatih Akın, music videos by Advanced Chemistry and M.I.A., literary texts by Yoko Tawada and Amara Lakhous, and a variety of online content, we will ask how these works respond to and intervene in political discussions of Europe's borders. In doing so, we will attend to transnational circulations, supranational institutions, as well as the ongoing significance of the nation-state; countries of focus will include Greece, Italy, Germany, France, and the U.K.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 343 Special Topics in Film (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film that introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Classes focus on close readings and discussions.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

GER 346 Memory on Film (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Examines personal and collective memory in a variety of cultural contexts and the strategies that film and literature use to represent it. We will also analyze the roles that truth-telling, trauma and national narratives play in memory's construction. From the German context, we will look specifically at cultural and social memory in understanding Germany's twentieth-century history. More generally, and in light of James Frey's controversial autobiography, we will examine general assumptions around memory and the extent to which it can be accurately rendered.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

GER 350 Modernes Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructors
Henke

Overview of modern German drama in the context of major developments in German, Swiss, and Austrian theater. Playwrights discussed include: Büchner, Brecht, Fleißer, Dürrenmatt, Frisch, Weiß, Bernhard, Tabori, Meinhof, and Jelinek. Taught in German.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

GER 351 Special Literary Topics
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor. (German 351: "Modernes Theater" offered in the spring.)

Instructor
Staff
Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include the Bildungsroman, crime fiction, Theory of Drama, Literature as Resistance, Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertolt Brecht.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 354 Contemporary German Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Overview of German literature since 1989, with particular emphasis on prose fiction and popular literature. Authors discussed include: Günter Grass, Judith Hermann, Florian Illies, Daniel Kehlmann, and Juli Zeh, among others. Taught in German.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

GER 361 Vienna 1900 - Now
Prerequisites & Notes

German 260 or permission of the instructor.

(Spring)

Instructor
Ellis

This course-which is taught in German-will focus on Austrian cultural productions such as literature, visual art, and film since 1900, examining these works in the context of Austria's tumultuous 20th-century history and in relation to more recent political developments. We will study how Austrian artists have responded to and intervened in key historical and political debates regarding the dissolution of the multiethnic Austro-Hungarian Empire, the social democratic interwar period, Austria's absorption into the Third Reich, questions of memory, guilt, and national identity after the Second World War, and contemporary issues of immigration, asylum, and the rise of the political far right. Special attention will be given to Vienna, Austria's political and cultural capital, beginning with the modernist art that flourished there at the turn of the 20th century. Objects of study will include paintings by Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, architecture by Otto Wagner and Adolf Loos, performance art by Christoph Schlingensief and Elfriede Jelinek, literary texts by Arthur Schnitzler, Ingeborg Bachmann, and Thomas Bernhard, and films by Anja Salomonowitz, and Ulrich Seidl. All readings, class discussions, and writing assignments will be in German.
 
Pending funding, students in the course will be able to apply to participate in an interdisciplinary study trip to Vienna in late May, which will also include students from Professor Ceka's POL 242: West European Politics.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 363 Special Topics in Film
Prerequisites & Notes

German 260 or permission of the instructor.
(Not offered  in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Selected topics primarily in German and Austrian film which introduce students to genres, historical periods, and methods of film analysis. Sample topics include an overview of German cinema, as well as German popular film. Classes are taught in German and focus on close readings and discussions.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
May be counted toward the interdisciplinary minor in Film and Media Studies.

GER 380 Studies in German Language, Literature, Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructors
Staff

Courses numbered 380-389 are taken with Duke/Davidson in Berlin.

GER 398 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor and the department chair. (Fall and Spring)

Instructor
Staff

For majors, minors, and other advanced students. Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student's work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student's accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements.

GER 430 Seminars (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Courses numbered 430-449 are seminars taught in translation. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

GER 433 The Holocaust and Representation (=HIS 433)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor 
Denham

History and historiography of the origins and execution of the Nazi genocide during World War II, with a focus on representations of the Holocaust and cultural memory practices in popular and public history, in the visual and performing arts and in literature, and especially in memorial structures and spaces.

This seminar includes a required study trip (at no cost to participants except for food) during the week of spring break. Students must agree to participate in the study trip in order to receive permission to add the course to WebTree.

GER 438 Berlin (=HIS 338)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor-Denham

The Berlin Republic of the Federal Republic of Germany is the seat of economic, political, and cultural power in Europe and the EU today. Key to understanding the role of Germany and Berlin in the world now is a historical understanding of how Berlin got to be what it is now. The course will also introduce students to the uses and methods of cultural geography, maps, various kinds of sources (diplomatic, cultural, geographic), and to competing historiographies and their politics in the context of Berlin, Germany, and Europe. The on-site component (pending funding) will allow students access to the "laboratory" for the course: archives, museums, people, memorial sites, architecture, the densely layered artifact that is Berlin now.

Satisfies a major requirement in German Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies a minor requirement in German Studies

Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement

GER 450 Seminars
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor. (German 455: "Poetik des Mordes" offered in the fall.)(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Henke

Courses numbered 450-479 are seminars taught in German. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

GER 495 Senior Colloquium
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
McCulloh

The Senior Colloquium will explore issues pertinent to German Studies and discuss research strategies. Each student will complete a thesis, in German (preferred) or in English, directed by an appropriate department member. Defense upon invitation only.

GER 498 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor and the department chair. (Fall and Spring)

Instructor
Staff

For majors or minors. Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student's work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student's accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements.

HIS 338 Berlin (=GER 438)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor Denham

The Berlin Republic of the Federal Republic of Germany is the seat of economic, political, and cultural power in Europe and the EU today. Key to understanding the role of Germany and Berlin in the world now is a historical understanding of how Berlin got to be what it is now. The course will also introduce students to the uses and methods of cultural geography, maps, various kinds of sources (diplomatic, cultural, geographic), and to competing historiographies and their politics in the context of Berlin, Germany, and Europe. The on-site component (pending funding) will allow students access to the "laboratory" for the course: archives, museums, people, memorial sites, architecture, the densely layered artifact that is Berlin now.  Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.

HIS 433 The Holocaust and Representation (=GER 433)
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission required.

Instructor 
Denham


History and historiography of the origins and execution of the Nazi genocide during World War II, with a focus on representations of the Holocaust and cultural memory practices in popular and public history, in the visual and performing arts and in literature, and especially in memorial structures and spaces.

This seminar includes a required study trip (at no cost to participants except for food) during the week of spring break. Students must agree to participate in the study trip in order to receive permission to add the course to web tree.