Computer Science Faculty

The members of the computer science faculty, drawn from the physics and mathematics departments, have considerable expertise, including Ph.D.s and current research work in applied computing fields such as artificial intelligence, numerical analysis, bioinformatics, physics simulations, and algorithms. We are committed to providing you with a strong foundation for a variety of careers and graduate studies in computer science and related fields.

Raghuram Ramanujan

Raghuram Ramanujan
Ph.D. Cornell University

My research interests span multiple areas of Artificial Intelligence, including single-agent and adversarial planning, combinatorial reasoning and machine learning. I teach a variety of courses across the computer science curriculum at Davidson. 

Tim Chartier

Tim Chartier
Ph.D. University of Colorado at Boulder

My research interests are in numerical analysis and applied mathematics, with a particular focus on ranking algorithms and sports analytics. I regularly supervise student projects and independent studies in these areas. In the past, I have spent time as a researcher in scientific computing at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Labs.

Stephen Davis

Stephen Davis
Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

My research interests center on abstract algebra, an area with close connections to cryptography and theoretical computer science. I have taught a variety of computer science courses, both at Davidson, and at Swarthmore College where I spent a sabbatical year as a visiting professor.

Laurie Heyer

Laurie Heyer
Ph.D. University of Colorado at Boulder

My teaching and research interests are in bioinformatics, a field at the intersection of biology, computer science and mathematics. I regularly supervise student projects in this area and authored the MicroArray Genome Imaging and Clustering (MAGIC) software tool that is widely used for analyzing genomic data.

Michael Mossinghoff

Michael Mossinghoff
Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin

My interests combine discrete mathematics and computer science, and I administer the computer science minor at Davidson. I study problems in number theory and combinatorics, subfields that have close connections to many areas of theoretical computer science. 

Richard Neidinger

Richard Neidinger
Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin

My focus is on problems from functional analysis and numerical methods in mathematics, and in particular, the theory and application of automatic differentiation. I teach courses on introductory programming and numerical analysis.

Carl Yerger

Carl Yerger
Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology

My teaching and research interests are centered around combinatorics and graph theory. I teach courses in algorithm analysis and game theory. I also help coach the Davidson student teams for the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contests.

Mario Belloni

Mario Belloni
Ph.D. University of Connecticut

My research focuses on theoretical physics and physics education. My research interests in theoretical physics lie in the mathematical and computational formulations of quantum mechanics. My interests in physics education research lie in the development and testing of interactive curricular materials, such as Physlets (Java-based physics applets) and open source physics, for use in a wide variety of physics courses.

Dan Boyle

Dan Boye
Ph.D. University of Georgia

My research interests include developing software for the rendering of 3D views of objects from 2D X-ray images taken from different perspectives, and in the computational modeling of energy transfer dynamics in phosphors. I teach a course in analog and digital electronics that includes topics such as synchronous and asynchronous digital logic, and assembly language programming of microprocessors.

Wolfgang Christian

Wolfgang Christian
Ph.D. North Carolina State University

My research interests are primarily in computational physics and instructional software design. I have been deeply involved in the ongoing development of interactive materials for teaching physics, including Physlets (Java-based physics applets) and open source physics. I teach an introductory course in computational physics.