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Sociology Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 320 Growing up Jim Crow (= EDU 320, SOC 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow. Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

COM 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= SOC 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies and Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 275 Mass Media & Society (= SOC 275)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

This course takes a critical approach to the study of the production and consumption of mass media, focusing on both the media industry in the United States and emerging forms of global media. Drawing upon various media-including television, radio, video games, and the Internet-the course will examine the economic and social organization of mass media, the content of media messages, the relationship between media and the public, the growth of new media technologies, and current dilemmas facing media policy makers. The course assumes that mass media and the industries that produce media products play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies.

Major credit in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Minor in Communication Studies.
Satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 315 Media Effects (= SOC 315)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

An exploration of relevant theories and practices of conducting media effects research in the mass mediated/disseminated communication contexts including television, radio, print, popular culture, internet, and other forms of new media. Topics include health, advertising, edutainment, stereotypes, violence, pornography, music videos, video games, news, and politics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies Communication Studies and Film and Media Studies interdisciplinary minor requirements.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

COM 350 Communication and Issues of Diversity (=SOC 350)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

The U.S. population continues to become increasingly more diverse, and this increased diversity creates newer, greater challenges for organizations (including government, nonprofit, and corporate entities) as well as for individual communicators. How do our upbringing and biases shape the way we characterize, interact with, and talk about others? The focus of this course is to introduce students to issues of power, race, class, and gender, as related to communication theory and practice.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

EDU 221 Schools and Society (=SOC 221)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Gay, Kelly

What really constitutes school success?  Is a liberal education the best education?  Do teachers treat children from different backgrounds unfairly?  What aspects of society do schools reproduce?  These are some of the questions that students will examine in this introductory course on contemporary educational theory and practice in schools.  Students will build an understanding of major social theories that have shaped their thinking about educational problems.  In addition, students will construct and reconstruct their own theoretical perspective to educational trends and debates in the United States.   

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

EDU 260 Oppression & Education (=SOC 260)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

EDU 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities (=SOC 290)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Kelly

In this hands-on methods course, students will build interdisciplinary research skills focused on the theory and practice of oral history.  We will explore the theories, methods, and debates surrounding one of the oldest research tools: oral testimony.  Students will learn to critically evaluate oral sources and use oral histories in conjunction with other forms of research.  Students will engage with the practical aspects of oral history by completing and transcribing two oral history interviews.  In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of individual and collective memory and the questions that both raise for writing oral history.  Each student will participate in a class oral history project.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology
Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Educational Studies
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement

 

EDU 320 Growing up Jim Crow (= AFR 320, =SOC 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow.  Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

EDU 330 Sociology of Education (=SOC 330)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Kelly

(Cross-listed as SOC 330.) An introduction to the sociological study of education in the United States, including an examination of the school as an organization within a larger environment. Explores the link between schools and social stratification by analyzing the mutually generative functions of schools and considers how processes within schools can lead to different outcomes for stakeholders.

Provides major credit in Sociology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

EDU 340 Education in African American Society (=SOC 340)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Kelly
(Cross-listed as SOC 340.) This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century.  We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society.  Students will write a seminar paper and complete a midterm and final review. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a major credit in Sociology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 




 

HHV 251 Health Disparities in the U.S. and Beyond (=SOC 251)
Prerequisites & Notes

HHV 110 "Introduction to Public Health" or HHV 392 "Introduction to Epidemiology"

Instructor
Baron

This course will explore connections between race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and U.S.  social policy with the historical and current trends in health disparities in the USA. This course will offer a foundation in both core concepts and theoretical frameworks for understanding health disparities in the US. Additionally, this course will introduce theory and strategies for developing health interventions and policies to address the crisis of racial, ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities in the USA.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HHV 280 Introduction to Global Health (= SOC 280)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Orroth

Global health is an emerging interdisciplinary field that approaches health issues as transnational challenges requiring multi-level, community-based solutions. This course introduces its major concepts, tools, and debates. Topics include global health inequities, historical and ongoing strategies for control of communicable diseases from smallpox to HIV/AIDS, the global rise in prominence of non-communicable disease, connections between social structures and the global distribution of disease, and debates over health as a human right. Students will learn to interpret and evaluate population health indicators, interact with WHO datasets, and analyze health interventions and policies from both solutions-oriented and critical perspectives.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HHV 320 Health, Culture and Illness in East Asia
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This seminar explores the health systems of East Asia using Arthur Kleinman's definition of a health system as the complex social system of healing supported by culture-bound understandings of health and illness, not merely the institutions that provide health services. Readings and discussion cover the major cultural and institutional characteristics of health, illness, and health care in Japan and mainland China, with more limited attention to Taiwan and South Korea. Discussion topics include the role of Chinese medicine, cultures of biomedicine, rapid demographic change, environmental/industrial diseases, and infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Particular attention is paid to the role of "plural" medical cultures in many East Asian contexts and how such syncretic health systems shape health practices and policies across the region.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in East Asian Studies.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

SOC 101 Introductory Sociology
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to seniors.

Instructor s
Marti, Ewoodzie

Introduction to the scientific study of human social interaction with particular focus on the mutual influences between individuals and the groups to which they belong; the basic theories, concepts and techniques used by sociologists in their research.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 102 Race, Class, Gender & Sexuality
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to seniors.

Instructor
Kaufman

This course addresses the multiple and intersecting ways race, class, gender, sexuality, individual life chances, and daily social interactions affect the larger society, we first take a detailed look at each of the core concepts: race, class, gender, and sexuality. Studying the "socially constructed" nature of these concepts, we ask what meanings and values have been attached to them, and how these social constructions help to rationalize and justify social inequality. We then analyze the significance of race, class, gender, and sexuality in a variety of institutional and interpersonal contexts, including schools, the workplace, families and relationships, and the criminal justice system.

 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

 

 

SOC 105 Race, Religion, & Donald Trump
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

The purpose of this course is to gain appreciation for sociological analysis at the intersection of race-ethnicity and religion through the life experience of Barack Obama.  We will consider a number of topics including the broader and complex effects of race and identity, politics and globalization, faith and community, economics and financial pressures, citizenship and public life, prejudice and discrimination, media and technology, as well as celebrity and symbolic leadership.


Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 201 Social Statistics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Deckard, Kaufman

Sociologists and other social scientists must describe and interpret social facts in order to make sense of the world around them. To do this, they often rely on the analysis of quantitative data using statistical methods. This course acts as a primer to sociological statistical analysis and students will learn to find and access social data, summarize patterns in that data, represent these patterns graphically, and explore relationships between different variables. Topics include descriptive measures, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi-square, correlation, and regression. This course is designed as a gateway to quantitative sociological research, and emphasis is on practice and implementation, with students also learning to use SPSS software.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

SOC 205 Race and Ethnic Relations
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

Comparative and historical study of social processes related to racial and ethnic differences in modern complex societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal distribution of power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.  
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 210 Power and Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Deckard

Power and Politics introduces students to political sociology, and to the study of the production, conservation and distribution of power. We are members of a democratic society: the political system is a reflection of the social system and our collective construction of both legitimate authority and the just exercise of power. For these reasons, the study of power and politics is important both as a way of gaining useful knowledge and as a vehicle for deepening one's understanding of political sociological theory. 

 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 212 Deviance and Social Control
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Sociological theories and research concerned with the definition and characteristics of behaviors that do not conform to moral and legal codes in society. Ways in which societies attempt to control and sanction such behavior.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 217 Gender and Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course introduces a critical approach to examining the social construction of gender. It explores several different perspectives on gender inequality and the role of social institutions such as family, education, economy, and media in creating the experience of gender in society.

Satisfies the Gender Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= COM 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include: culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender Studies and Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor. 

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
 

SOC 221 Schools and Society (= EDU 221)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Gay, Kelly

What really constitutes school success?  Is a liberal education the best education?  Do teachers treat children from different backgrounds unfairly?  What aspects of society do schools reproduce?  These are some of the questions that students will examine in this introductory course on how social theories have shaped educational policies and practice.  We will read the primary works of major social educational theorists, such as Karl Marx, John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Pierre Bourdieu, and Annette Lareau, and Patricia Hill Collins.  The course requires 15 hours of observation in a school.

Counts toward the Education Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 222 Sociology of Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

What is "culture" and how do we study it? The concept itself often oscillates from how we express the beliefs we hold about reality, through the norms and values that orient our moral commitments, and the symbols that "contain" our beliefs. Today, cultural approaches have been incorporated into a wide range of areas in sociology, including the law, sexuality, education, science, economic markets, formal organizations, popular culture, and race and ethnicity. 

Satisfies the Social Science Thought requirement.

SOC 225 Religion and Non-Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

The sociology of religion pursues an understanding of both the "social-ness" of religion itself and the mutually influencing interactions between religion and its social environment.  We will analyze religious beliefs, practices, and organizations from a sociological perspective, with a primary focus on religion in contemporary American society.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 226 The Construction of the Criminal
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Deckard

Every local jurisdiction in the United States-at the city or township or parish or county level-is served by a police force and a prosecutor. They are supposed to protect all of us from criminals. They are also supposed to act in the interest of justice by following rules meant to protect the innocent from arrest and conviction. Unfortunately, in many of the thousands of jurisdictions, police arrest and lawyers prosecute innocent men and women. This is not conjecture. This is fact. The consequences of wrongful conviction are enormous, including the obvious reality that when the wrong person is arrested, the actual perpetrator is probably at liberty to murder or rape or rob again. During this semester, we will talk and read about the criminal justice system-why it works well much of the time in most jurisdictions, and why wrongful convictions occur some of the time in way too many of the jurisdictions.

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 227 Hip Hop and Urban Sociology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

Our goal in this course is to interrogate some of the most pressing social problems that face urban Americans, paying particular attention to racial minorities who live in the most impoverished sections. We do so by comparing representations of these locales in hip hop music with social scientific research. We will cover four topics: economic inequality; housing and residential segregation; violence, crime, and punishment; and intimate life.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 228 Sociology of Cities and Urban Life
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

Today, most of the world's people dwell in urban areas, and there is every indication that the future will be dominated by cities. Increasingly, then, the study of society is the study of urban society. Some of the principal questions of urban sociology are: (1) how and why cities come into being, (2) why they tend to become organized in particular ways, (3) how they are structured internally, (4) how people living in cities interact with one another, (5) how cities affect regions and individual nations, and (6) how urbanization and urbanism create different social problems.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 230 Sociology of Work
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

Work not only occupies a central role in our lives, it is closely intertwined with other social institutions and social processes, especially social inequality. Work is perhaps the most important way in which society impacts our social experiences and life chances. Throughout the course, we will challenge the taken-for-granted notions about what constitutes work, what constitutes an occupation or profession, and the value of the economic vs. the social as a work outcome.  Topics will include: contemporary issues in 21st century work; a look at work during and after the Industrial Revolution; major theorist's contributions to the study of work; work and self in the service industry; work and self among professionals and managers; and the modern distinction between work and family.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 231 Leadership & Organizations
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

Leaders, teams, and organizations are closely intertwined in the operations of social institutions, social structures, and social processes.  The course provides an introduction to models and theories of leadership, processes inherent in the dynamics of small group interactions, and critical insights from organizational theory.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 235 Sociology of the South
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

SOC 237 Boys and Men in Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course focuses on the diverse experiences of boys and men. We start with the social construction of masculinities across race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Through this, we consider the advantages as well as the costs of contemporary notions of masculinity. We examine how boys learn to be men from pre-K through college. We then turn to men's experiences and interactions with various institutions, including work, family, and the media. We then consider the significance of violence in constructing masculinities. Finally, we focus on more inclusive conceptions of masculinity and men's role in promoting gender equality. We view all these issues through an intersectional lens, considering gender, race, class, and sexuality. 

Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 240 Social Movements
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An introduction to social movements as distinctive social spaces in which relatively powerless groups of people make collective efforts to affect history.  Explores the major sociological approaches to studying these efforts, as well as the dynamics of social movement emergence, goals and messages, tactics and strategies, organization structures, internal conflicts, and activist identity formation.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 242 Globalization & Social Change
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An introduction to some of the social consequences of the multi-faceted and contested process of globalization. Explores how cultural, economic, and political globalizations are all altering the social landscape, social relationships, and social institutions including patterns of work, cultural consumption, migration, and family relations. Also looks at how diverse groups of people are actively trying to shape globalization in particular ways.

Satisfies a requirement in the Sociology major.
Satisfies a requirement in the International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 243 Global Health and Social Inequalities
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The course introduces students to global health topics with a particular emphasis on sociological determinants of health and illness and inequalities in health outcomes across global regions, social class, race, and gender. Major substantive topics include demographic and epidemiological transitions, gender and reproductive health, human rights, and disparities in the "global burden of disease." In this course, we will also evaluate the role of state actors and policies, international institutions, such as the World Bank, the World Health Organization, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), in the organization and delivery of health services, both in the Global South and within disadvantaged communities in the Global North.

Satisfies Medical Humanities and International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor requirements.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 246 American Families
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

Introduction to families in the USA. Dating, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, remarriage, intergenerational relationships, domestic violence, and family policy are explored. Attention is given to issues of race, and class, gender, and sexuality.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Gender Sexuality Studies major and minor requirements.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 247 Global Development & Underdevelopment
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This course introduces theory, research, and current debates in causes of global development and underdevelopment.  The course takes a critical and empirically grounded sociological approach.  Moreover, given the growing complexity of the international development agenda, the course material occasionally also draw from other social sciences including anthropology, economics, and political science. The course begins by tracing the historical chronology of the "development project" starting from the end of World War II to the present by focusing on changing meanings and "measures" of global development over time. The second part of the course uses case studies from Africa, Asia, and Latin America to introduce  correlates of global development and institutions that engender (or hinder) socioeconomic improvement.  Substantive topics include: international trade, globalization and global governance, state formation and democratization, the failures of foreign aid, development from below and NGOs, microfinance, gender and development, and sustainable development.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 250 Inequality in America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

Theories and comparative examples of the unequal distribution of social resources and the consequences of inequality for social life.  Analysis of class structure, social mobility, and social programs to reduce inequality.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 251 Health Disparities in the U.S. and Beyond (=HHV 251)
Prerequisites & Notes

HHV 110 "Introduction to Public Health" or HHV 392 "Introduction to Epidemiology"

Instructor
Baron

This course will explore connections between race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and U.S.  social policy with the historical and current trends in health disparities in the USA. This course will offer a foundation in both core concepts and theoretical frameworks for understanding health disparities in the US. Additionally, this course will introduce theory and strategies for developing health interventions and policies to address the crisis of racial, ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities in the USA.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

 

SOC 260 Oppression & Education (=EDU 260)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 265 Population & Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course provides an introduction to social demography: the sociological study of human population processes and their relationship with social, economic, and political changes. The course will begin with an introduction of population characteristics, including its size, growth, and age distribution, followed by a discussion of population dynamics, which are fertility, mortality, and migration. The second part of the course will cover population topics that are relevant in planning and policy debates such as: marriage and family, population health, urbanization, population aging, population and environment, and population changes and economic development in the Global South.

Satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.

SOC 272 Human Geography (= ENV 272)
Prerequisites & Notes

No prerequisites are required.

Instructor
Rose

Human geography is the study of multifaceted and dynamic relationships between people and places. Complex interactions and interdependencies of societies provide a basis for the study of humans in various landscapes. This course offers understandings of how people's lives are influenced by the places that surround them and how they, in turn, create and change those places. Fundamental geographic concepts will help make sense of our globalizing world and its implications for our everyday lives. We will explore a range of geographic topics, as well as some concepts and methods used in geographic study. This course is a lecture and discussion course designed to provide students with concepts and ideas that are foundational to the study of the geography of human systems. The course features cartographic and social science concepts to support students in their geographic knowledge and analysis of seven broad themes: spatial perspectives; population and migration; cultural patterns and processes; political organization of space; agriculture, food production, and rural land use; cities and urban land use; industrialization and economic development.

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies an Interdisciplinary Minor requirement in Environmental Studies.

SOC 275 Mass Media & Society (= COM 275)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

This course takes a critical approach to the study of the production and consumption of mass media, focusing on both the media industry in the United States and emerging forms of global media. Drawing upon various media - including television, radio, video games, and the Internet - the course will examine the economic and social organization of mass media, the content of media messages, the relationship between media and the public, the growth of new media technologies, and current dilemmas facing media policy makers. The course assumes that mass media and the industries that produce media products play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies.

Major credit in Sociology.
Counts toward the Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

SOC 280 Introduction to Global Health (=HHV 280)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Orroth

Global health is an emerging interdisciplinary field that approaches health issues as transnational challenges requiring multi-level, community-based solutions. This course introduces its major concepts, tools, and debates. Topics include global health inequities, historical and ongoing strategies for control of communicable diseases from smallpox to HIV/AIDS, the global rise in prominence of non-communicable disease, connections between social structures and the global distribution of disease, and debates over health as a human right. Students will learn to interpret and evaluate population health indicators, interact with WHO datasets, and analyze health interventions and policies from both solutions-oriented and critical perspectives.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

SOC 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities (=EDU 290)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Kelly

In this hands-on methods course, students will build interdisciplinary research skills focused on the theory and practice of oral history.  We will explore the theories, methods, and debates surrounding one of the oldest research tools: oral testimony.  Students will learn to critically evaluate oral sources and use oral histories in conjunction with other forms of research.  Students will engage with the practical aspects of oral history by completing and transcribing two oral history interviews.  In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of individual and collective memory and the questions that both raise for writing oral history.  Each student will participate in a class oral history project.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology
Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Educational Studies
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement

SOC 300 Education in African American Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century. We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 305 Refugees, Migrants, and the Stateless
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Deckard

Refugees, Migrants, and the Stateless engages students in the realities of the global flows of people - applying citizenship theory to understand the spectrum of labor coercion, the refugee camp as non-place, and the ways in which free capital may be at odds with regulated bodies. Profound changes in global exchanges of goods, ideas and labor in the 20th century require scholars to critically engage with notions of citizenship, belonging and inclusion. For this reason, the study of refugees, migrants and the stateless is important both as a way of gaining useful knowledge and as a vehicle for deepening one's understanding the worsening problems of displacement in the 21st century.

 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

SOC 310 Gender, Race, and Sports
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

In this course, we will examine the interrelations between gender, race, and sports. We will view sports through a sociological lens and consider how sports are shaped by and in turn shape social interaction. We will focus on how sports influence our definitions of masculinity and femininity, the opportunities and obstacles sports provide for members of different racial/ethnic and gender groups, and the images associated with race, gender, and sports. We consider why certain sports are associated with certain races, how sport is used to prove masculinity, experiences of gay athletes, Title IX and issues of gender segregation, the politics of gender verification, sports as an opportunity for upward mobility, exploitation in college sports, racial position segregation in college football, sports and violence, the criminalization of black masculinity in sports, mascots and racial imagery, and representations of race and gender in sports media.

Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies Major and Minor, Africana Studies Major and Minor, and Social Science Thought.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 312 Gender, Race and Class in Media
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course explores issues relevant to gender, race, and class in media. The course begins with the premise that all knowledge is constructed. As with other institutions, the media play a critical role in the construction of knowledge, particularly that related to our ideas about gender, race, and class. This course will mainly emphasize the representation of gender, race, and class in media.

Satisfies the Gender Studies, Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.

SOC 315 Media Effects (= COM 315)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

An exploration of relevant theories and practices of conducting media effects research in the mass mediated/disseminated communication contexts including television, radio, print, popular culture, internet, and other forms of new media. Topics include health, advertising, edutainment, stereotypes, violence, pornography, music videos, video games, news, and politics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies Communication Studies and Film and Media Studies interdisciplinary minor requirements.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

SOC 317 Gender and Globalization
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Explores the gendered effects of contemporary processes of globalization.  Focusing primarily on women's lives, the course examines how cultural, political and economic globalizations are changing the landscape of gender relations.  Students will become familiar with many of the current issues and debates in transnational gender research, including the implications of economic development/modernization, neoliberalism, militarization, and population control agendas. Also examines work and labor, transnational families and care work, sexuality across borders, and struggles for human rights.

Satisfies the International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor, and the Gender Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 320 Growing Up Jim Crow (= AFR 320, EDU 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow.  Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 330 Sociology of Education (=EDU 330)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

An introduction to the sociological study of education in the United States, including an examination of the school as an organization within a larger environment. Explores the link between schools and social stratification by analyzing the mutually generative functions of schools and considers how processes within schools can lead to different outcomes for stakeholders.

Satisfies the Education Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SOC 331 Theoretical Explorations of Community Engagement
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Riemer

An examination of community engagement through a range of theoretical lenses. After interrogating constructions of "community," "service," and "civic engagement," we will explore the ways in which topics such as social justice, civic engagement, empowerment, diversity, and the ethics of service frame community work. Specific enactments of community involvement are explored including philanthropy, volunteerism, social entrepreneurship, and activism with a focus on leadership and change.

Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 333 Organizing Innovation and Creativity in Organizations
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Petkova

This course examines major innovations in organizations and asks whether innovation itself can be organized. We will study a range of forms of organizing (e.g., bureaucratic, post-bureaucratic, and open architecture network forms) in a broad variety of settings: from food systems to the military-entertainment complex, from airline cockpits to Wall Street trading rooms, from engineering firms to mega-churches, from improv-comedy to PowerPoint demonstrations, from scientific management at the turn of the twentieth century to collaborative filtering and open source programming at the beginning of the twenty-first.  Special attention will be paid to relationship between organizational forms and new digital technologies. Basic concepts in organizational analysis - groups, projects, communities, knowledge, networks, search, collaboration, space, location, users, producers - are revisited when organizational design cannot be separated from design of the digital interface.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

 

SOC 340 Education in African American Society (=EDU 340)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century. We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Education Interdisciplinary Minor.
Africana Studies

SOC 350 Communication and Issues of Diversity (=COM 350)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

 

The U.S. population continues to become increasingly more diverse, and this increased diversity creates newer, greater challenges for organizations (including government, nonprofit, and corporate entities) as well as for individual communicators. How do our upbringing and biases shape the way we characterize, interact with, and talk about others? The focus of this course is to introduce students to issues of power, race, class, and gender, as related to communication theory and practice.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

SOC 360 Medical Sociology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Sociological factors of health and illness, social organization of modern medicine, sociological analysis of the role and status of medical and paramedical personnel in this country, and the social differences in the acquisition of medical aid and in the reaction to medical treatment.

Satisfies the Health and Human Services Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 363 Urban Geography (= ENV 373)
Prerequisites & Notes

No prerequisites are required.

Instructor
Rose

Urban landscapes differ dramatically from other spaces on the planet in their physical structure, economic base, governance patterns, and intensity of social interactions. Cities are often characterized by striking inequalities in income distribution, social and spatial mobility, access to resources, and forms of cultural expression. Conflicting social forces and economic processes make urban areas vibrant and complex phenomena, and cities are often presented as both the problem and the solution for a sustainable future. This course introduces analysis of contemporary urban systems, with an emphasis on spatial and geographic patterns and processes. We will examine the contradictions and conflicts inherent in the development of U.S. and international cities, as well as the centrality of urban system development in the evolution of local and global political economies. Lectures, discussions, and field trips will provide both theoretical frameworks and contextualized experiences of urban social life. Our examinations of the changing economic, social, political, and environmental dynamics of cities will focus on a wide range of topics, including economic processes, governmental management, urban form, land use, housing, migration, transportation, socioenvironmental justice, and political ecology, among others.

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Environmental Studies.

SOC 370 Major Sociological Theorists
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti, Ewoodzie

This course provides an introduction to the central issues in sociological theory.  We will draw from both the "classical" period as well as the major "contemporary" developments of sociology through examining major figures and ideas of sociological theory in their historical context.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 371 Contemporary Race Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

 

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 372 Feminist Theories
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Introduces students to key concepts and debates within feminist social theory.  Explores the significance of gender within social life, how gender is produced at the individual and institutional levels , as well as feminist conceptualizations of 'the good society.' Addresses key questions of social theory including the relationship between individuals and social structures, the construction of identities, and the meaning of power.

Satisfies the Gender and Sexuality Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.

SOC 373 Contemporary Social Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only.

 

Instructor
Ewoodzie

This course is designed to provide broad overview of contemporary social theory and introduces you to the concepts, writings, and arguments of some of the most important social theorists of the 20th century. We will discuss complex interrelated cultural, social, political and economic issues and discover how social theorists have dealt with them during the decades in the 20th century when their theories were advanced. Most important, we will endeavor to understand how these issues affect our understanding of the world and the everyday lived experience. The terms and concepts we will get familiarized with are concepts such as social mechanisms, social action, social structure, as well as modernity, post-structuralism, critical theory, rational choice theory, postmodernism, and cultural studies.  

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

 

SOC 380 Sociology of Hollywood
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to first year students.

Instructor 
Marti

Hollywood is more than geography; it is a vibrant, international network of people producing entertainment for fame and profit.  This seminar pursues a sociological analysis of the social space called "Hollywood": its genesis, operation, and influence.  The class begins with an exploration of the construction of Hollywood itself (e.g., geographic beginnings, the studio system, industry occupations, and financial realities) and then considers the broader effects of the entertainment industry on contemporary American society (e.g., relations with governmental and religious institutions, structures in film production and distribution, and the interrelationship of the entertainment industry and popular culture).

SOC 382 Men and Masculinities
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to first-year students.

Instructor 
Kaufman

In this course we will pay close attention to the construction of masculinities and how men both affect and are affected by the current gendered social order. Throughout the course, we will consider how men are enabled or constrained by key social characteristics such as age, race/ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. In particular, we will address the following issues: the concept of hegemonic masculinity; the gender gap in education; the challenges men face as they move from adolescence to adulthood; masculinities in the workplace; body image among men; male infertility; Black masculinity in popular culture; the criminalization of minority males; and the deterioration of white men's sense of entitlement.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 386 Religion and Young Adults
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

What does religious commitment look like among young adults? Our focus in this class will center on young adults in America--those often labeled "emerging adults"--and the nature of their religious involvement (or lack thereof) from adolescence through their later 20s. The continuation of any religious tradition is dependent on the ability to pass along beliefs and practices across generations. Yet, the challenges of sustaining religion appears to be increasing, although unevenly and in not-so-obvious ways. De-conversion, disaffiliation, and disbelief are growing options, and religious diversity and tolerance are more important than ever. Overall, this seminar pursues the most current sociological analysis available at the intersection of age and religion. Our class begins with a broad discussion of Karl Mannheim's classic discussion on "the problem of generations" and a conceptual discussion of age, generation , and historical effects. The class continues with an analysis of religion in adolescence. Several research sources on the complexities of young adult religion will quickly culminate into an examination of topics including family relationships, peer influences, sexuality, parachurch organizations, college students, and dating/courtship dynamics.

Satisfies a distribution credit in Social Scientific Thought.

SOC 388 Marriage in the Age of Trump
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump became the 45th President of the United States. After much momentum that culminated in Obergefell v. Hodges, the Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage throughout the country, many feared that marriage equality would not last under a Trump presidency. In this course, we will focus on the impact of Trump's election on marriage and family, particularly for LGBTQ families. We start by considering the historical battles and shifts that led to marriage equality, including disagreement on the importance of marriage within the LGBTQ community; efforts for domestic partnerships; the defense of marriage at the federal and state levels; court cases, legislation, and ballot initiatives at the state level; and the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges. We then examine meanings of marriage for same-sex couples, including marriage as material right, marriage as protest, and marriage as validation. Next we consider the impact of same-sex marriage on the institution of marriage and LGBTQ people by focusing on societies where same-sex marriage has been legal for years. This course is organized as a research seminar so students will engage in their own research projects over the course of the semester.

 

SOC 390 Qualitative Research Methods
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti, Ewoodzie

This class provides students with training in qualitative field research methods, with an emphasis on participant observation and in-depth interviewing. Students will conduct their own semester-long empirical research projects, going through the entire process of research design, data collection, coding, analysis, and writing. Readings and class sessions will focus on both theoretical foundations and techniques of interpretive, qualitative research. One of the best ways to develop research skills is to get out there and try it, to reflect on the process as you go, and to talk about what is working and not working for you with a group of colleagues and peers. Therefore, students will have extensive opportunities to reflect on their own research practices, learning by doing.

SOC 391 Survey Methodology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Deckard, Kaufman

This course introduces students to survey research methods.  Sociology is based on empirical data.  Sociologists are trained to collect data in order to answer questions.  One of the most commonly used forms of data collection within sociology is the survey.  In this course, students will gain experience in designing a survey, sampling, administering a survey, and analyzing survey data. 

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

 

SOC 392 Quantitative Data Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

A semester of college-level introductory statistics course in Sociology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, or Mathematics, such as SOC 260, ECO 105, POL 221, or MAT 341.

Instructor
Deckard, Kaufman

The purpose of this class is to prepare you as a future producer and evaluator of high-quality quantitative research - whether as a social scientist, as a decision-maker in a corporate setting, or as a designer and evaluator of social policy. Extending theoretical concepts from introductory Social Statistics coursework, this class provides students with hands-on quantitative analysis experience using existing quantitative research. We survey, and learn to replicate and evaluate, various types of regressions, structural equation models, and longitudinal analyses. Additionally, students learn to critically engage with and evaluate social network analyses, geo-spatial analyses and mixed method research methodologies. Students will complete a capstone project that builds on their existing research, ending the semester with a manuscript able to be presented at a formal conference.


Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 394 Advanced Seminar in Global Health Methods
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This course surveys research methods in interdisciplinary global health with an emphasis on field methods. We'll focus on strategies and techniques for collecting qualitative and quantitative data in the field, then processing and analyzing it in ways that are useful for generating theory and testing hypotheses. You will field test a variety of methods, including survey research, participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and grounded-theory coding techniques for natural social discourse. For your final project, you will propose, design, and pilot your own research protocol for IRB approval. The research methods we will study have their origins in sociology, public health, and anthropology and can be applied to many sociological questions outside health and medicine. What makes this course different from a less specific research methods course is that we will also take time to consider the ethical, legal, logistical, and methodological challenges inherent in doing research on health.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

 

SOC 395 Independent Research in Sociology
Prerequisites & Notes

Second-, third-, or fourth-year standing, two courses in sociology, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Staff

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the research and determines the means of evaluation. Students who are interested in writing a thesis should sign up for SOC 495.

SOC 410 Advanced Seminars in Sociology, SOC 410-419
Prerequisites & Notes

Third or fourth year standing and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Staff

Topics announced in advance.

SOC 430 Race and Religious Faith
Prerequisites & Notes

Third or fourth year standing and permission of the instructor.

Instructor 
Marti

The seminar focuses on the historic Black Church in America as well as religion and migration among non-native, ethnic congregations (whether church, temple, or mosque) in order to examine the relations between race-ethnicity, religion, and broader civic society today. The course also examines the rare achievement of multi-ethnic/multi-racial religious communities. The broader and complex effects of politics and globalization, economics and financial pressures, citizenship and public life, prejudice and discrimination, media and technology, innovations and social change will be discussed throughout the course.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SOC 440 The Sociology of Beatties Ford Road
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of Instructor

To gain permission, please send the following information to the instructor:

Research Interest: In three or so sentences, tell me about a research interest you'd like to explore through this class.  And, in two sentences, tell me about your previous research experience. 

I will be in touch with you by October 31st to let you know if you I was able to accommodate your request. (Please keep in mind that there are only 15 slots.)

 

Instructor
Ewoodzie

There is an old tradition in sociology where scholars focus their energies on understanding the life and inner-workings of a section of one city.  The first of these kinds of works was W. E. B DuBois' investigation of Philadelphia's 7th Ward, which culminated in the publication of the seminal text The Philadelphia Negro.  Several decades later, Robert Park directed several studies of south-side Chicago neighborhoods that surround the University of Chicago.  The Sociology of Beatties Ford Road, which will be a collaborative effort with Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU), will follow in this tradition.  The class will be held on JCSU's campus, with JCSU students, and a JCSU faculty.  Our objectives will be to study various aspects of social life of that neighborhood, including, but not limited to, gentrification, public health, education, criminal justice, and slavery on Latta Plantation.  We will read various examples of community studies and study their methods, but, for the bulk of the class, we will work in groups to develop our own research projects.  At the end of the semester, there is an opportunity for a few students to participant in a 6 week DRI-like summer research program to continue their research.  

 

SOC 488 Fatherhood
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This seminar focuses on the social, cultural, and historical study of fatherhood.  We start by breaking down stereotypes of fathers from the past and using this to reconsider modern fathers. As we consider current American society (mainly), we start with young men's procreative consciousness (ideas and awareness about conception, pregnancy, abortion, and potential fatherhood). We consider fathers as gendered beings asking questions such as, can men mother? We discuss the experiences of stay-at-home fathers, gay fathers, stepfathers, and single fathers. Finally, we consider fathers' rights movements.

SOC 495 Independent Research in Sociology
Prerequisites & Notes

Second-, third-, or fourth-year standing, two courses in sociology, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Staff

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the research and determines the means of evaluation. Students who are interested in writing a thesis should sign up for SOC 495.