Classics Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
CLA 111 The Ancient World
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Offered annually, Fall only.)

Instructor
Krentz

Introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history, with particular attention to how we know what we know, resources (print, electronic, material) for studying the classical world, and opportunities for research in this field.

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.

May be applied toward a major in History.

CLA 121 Greek Literature in Translation
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Spring)

May be applied toward a major in English.

Instructor
Cheshire

Selected works from a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. 

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

CLA 122 Roman Literature in Translation
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Offered in alternate years.)

May be applied toward a major in English.

Instructor
Totten

Selected works of Roman literature from the early Republic through the Empire.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

CLA 131 Introduction to Classical Archaeology
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Offered in alternate years.)

May be applied toward a minor in archaeology.

Instructor
Totten

Introduction to the field of Classical Archaeology from its inception in the 19th century to the present. The course will explore the evolution of the principles and methods employed in the study of the material cultures of the Greek and Roman world, from text- and art-based approaches to the more sophisticated scientific methodologies used today.

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.

CLA 141 Greek Art and Architecture
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Fall)

May be applied toward a major in Art History.

Instructor
Toumazou

Minoan-Mycenaean art and architecture of the Aegean Bronze Age; later Greek art and architecture from the Geometric to the Hellenistic period.

Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

CLA 142 Roman Art and Architecture
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Offered in alternate years.)

May be applied toward a major in Art History.

Instructor 
Toumazou

Art and architecture of the Roman Republic and Empire, including influences of earlier Etruscan and Hellenistic Greek art upon the Romans. 

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

CLA 231 Greek History
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to seniors. (Not offered 2012-13.)

Instructor 
Krentz

(Cross-listed History 109). Introduction to the history and culture of ancient Greece.
Students entering 2012: Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.

CLA 232 Roman History
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to seniors. (Fall)

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed History 110). Introduction to the history and culture of the ancient Roman world.

Students entering 2012: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.

CLA 234 Athenian Law
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Krentz

Analysis of the Athenian legal process in a discussion-intensive approach using surviving Athenian speeches as case studies.

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.

May be applied toward a major in History.

CLA 244 Field School in Mediterranean Archaeology
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Summer only.)

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Archaeology.

Instructor
Toumazou

Intensive, on-site training in archaeological field methods and techniques. Daily instruction on excavation and recording, lectures by specialists, visits to other archaeological sites and museums. Conducted at a site near Athienou in south-central Cyprus.

CLA 245 Field School in Italian Archaeology
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Summer only.)

Instructor
Totten

Instruction in archaeological field methods and laboratory work, as well as discussion of theoretical interpretation of archaeological data in the context of an Italian archaeological site potentially across multiple time periods (prehistoric, pre-Roman, Roman, late antique and medieval).

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.


Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Archaeology.

CLA 246 Ancient Economy
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Becker

The mechanics of the ancient economy, with special attention to the economy of ancient Italy and the Roman empire, including economic systems across the Mediterranean basin and beyond.

CLA 246 Ethics in Archaeology and Art
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Spring)

Instructor
Krentz

Using the case method, this course considers a range of ethical dilemmas involving stewardship, commercialization, public education, intellectual property, public reporting and publication, indigenous rights, and more, including issues faced by museums.

Satisfies Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.


Counts toward an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Archaeology.

CLA 247 The Ancient Environment
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Not offered in 2016-2017)

Instructor
Totten

Explores the diverse interactions of the ancient Greeks and Romans with their natural environments, including social and religious conceptions of environment as well as practical topics such as resource extraction and exploitation, landscape modification, and the strain of urban life.

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

CLA 248 Life in the Ancient City
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Totten

An exploration of everyday life in the ancient city through the study of archaeological remains and textual sources. We will confront the myriad political, economic, social and religious interactions that happened in an urban context. Case studies include Athens, Rome, Ephesus and Pompeii. Appropriate for all students.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Archaeology.
Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.

CLA 250 Classical Mythology
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

Investigates the evidentiary remains of Greco-Roman mythology (primarily, but not exclusively, textual) and aims to arrive at an understanding of myth in its multi-faceted context.

Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

CLA 252 Classics in the Cinema
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Krentz

Analysis of films set in the ancient Roman world, including the cultural and political context in which the films were made.

Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

CLA 254 The Classical Tradition
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

Instructor
Neumann

Overview of the field of classics; the history of the reception of Greco-Roman antiquity; the state of the field today.

CLA 255 Greek Sports and Athletic Festivals
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Spring)

Instructor
Toumazou

Ideal of the athlete in the Greek system of values explored through art and archaeology, literature, and inscriptions. Selected victory odes of Pindar and field demonstrations of individual athletic events.

Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

CLA 277 Rome vs. Carthage
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

Instructor
Staff

Examines the rise of Rome and Carthage, the series of wars they fought for control of the western Mediterranean from 264-146 BC, and the long-term effects on Roman and European history.

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
 

CLA 280 Troy and the Trojan War
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Toumazou

Employing a multiplicity of approaches and methodologies (art-historical, archaeological, historical, etc.) this course aims to partake in the complexity (impossibility?) of answering seemingly simple questions such as: Was there ever a Troy? Did Homer's Trojan War ever happen?

CLA 332 Greeks and Persians
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Spring)

Instructor
Krentz

This course explores the various cultural, economic, military, political, and religious interactions between the Greeks and the Achaemenid Persians, rulers of the first world empire, and investigates how Herodotus, the "Father of History," constructed his grand narrative. The focus will be on the period from Cyrus the Great to Xerxes (559-478 BCE) but will include some attention to the later Greek and the modern reception of this early confrontation between east and west, including the movie 300.

Satisfies a major requirement in Classics

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies the Historical Thought Distribution Requirement

CLA 399 Independent Study in Classical Civilization
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor
Staff

Research and writing under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) and evaluates the student's work.

CLA 435 Alexander the Great
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017)

Instructor
Krentz 

Investigation of Alexander's career from its grounding in Phillip II's Macedon to his intentions at the time of his premature death.  Emphasis on military, political, and religious questions.

CLA 436 The Roman Revolution
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017)

Instructor
Krentz

The Roman Revolution is the title of an influential book by Sir Ronald Syme, who follows Asinius Pollio in taking 60 BCE as the start of the collapse of the republican form of government. This course will take the broader view adopted by T. Mommsen and other scholars who, like Appian, begin with the tribunate of Tiberius Gracchus in 133. We will study the political story of the fall of the republic together, and then split up to research aspects of the other side of our theme, the Roman cultural revolution. If you prefer, you may research a topic relating to Octavian's transformation of Roman institutions and culture into the Roman Empire.

CLA 437 Roman Imperialism
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Krentz

Roman overseas conquests and their results, from the wars with Carthage to the annexation of Dacia.

CLA 441 The Parthenon
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Toumazou

Exploration of the architectural, aesthetic, religious and political contexts of the Parthenon, including its impact through the ages. The class will visit the recreation of the Parthenon in Nashville.

CLA 442 The Falls of Rome
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Totten

Considers the various narratives of the Roman empire's decline and fall from the 3rd-7th c. CE based on the historical and material evidence.

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.

CLA 450 Cicero and His World
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

An examination of the life and works of the statesman, orator and intellectual Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE).

CLA 451 Troy and the Trojan War
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor
Toumazou

The Seminar will explore the legends surrounding Troy in Classical Art and Literature and evaluate the 'historicity' of the Trojan War through Archaeology.  Satisfies the Liberal Studies Requirement.

CLA 452 Pompeii
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

This seminar examines the physical (archaeological and artistic), epigraphical and literary evidence in order to gain a greater understanding of Pompeii (and Herculaneum) and of Roman history (social and geo-political).

CLA 453 Hellenistic Alexandria
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

A collaborative examination of literary, historical, and archaeological evidence for Alexandria in the Hellenistic Period. Special attention will be devoted to the political, religious, intellectual, and aesthetic interests of the Ptolemaic capital.

CLA 480 Senior Research Seminar
Prerequisites & Notes

Required of senior Classics majors. (Fall)

Instructor
Krentz

Capstone course for classics majors. Students define, research, and write a major research paper on a topic of their choice.

Satisfies a major requirement in Classics.

CLA 499 Senior Thesis
Prerequisites & Notes

Admission by consent of the Department of Classics.


Writing of a thesis under the supervision of an appropriate professor. Oral defense before the entire Classics faculty required.

GRE 101 Elementary Greek I
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Fall only.)

Instructor
Neumann

Introduction to Attic Greek. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers.

GRE 102 Elementary Greek II
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Spring only.)

Instructor
Neumann

Continuing introduction to Attic Greek. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers.

GRE 103 Intensive Introductory Greek
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Spring only)

Instructor
Neumann

For beginners. Introduction and development of basic skills, particularly reading, along with presentation of the fundamental structures of Greek. Requires participation in AT sessions. Meets six class hours per week. [Equivalent to Greek 101 and 102, counting for two courses.]

 

GRE 201 Intermediate Greek
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Fall only.)

Instructor 
Toumazou

Readings in Greek literature.

GRE 211 Homer
Prerequisites & Notes

 Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 311. (Fall)
 

Instructor
Cheshire

Close readings of Homeric poetry in light of current scholarship and the epic cycle.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 213 Lyric Poetry
Prerequisites & Notes

 Students who have alrleady taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 313. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

Greece's so-called "lyric" poems of ca. 650-450 BCE, those smaller jewels that sparkle just offstage and from under epic's shadow, including the works of Sappho, Pindar, Hipponax, Archilochus, Simonides, and Solon. 

GRE 214 Greek Tragedy: Sophocles' Oedipus the King
Prerequisites & Notes

 Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 314. (Tentatively scheduled for Fall 2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

A close reading in Greek of Sophocles' Oedipus the King in light of its context and current scholarship.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 216 Greek Rhetoric
Prerequisites & Notes

 Students who have taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 316. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

Selections from Aristotle, Plato, Demosthenes, Lysias, and/or Andocides.

GRE 217 Hellenistic Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

 Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 317. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

Readings from the novel Daphnis and Chloe with a view toward developing greater facility reading Greek and an understanding of the conventions of the ancient novel.

GRE 218 New Testament Greek
Prerequisites & Notes

 Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 318. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Krentz

The language, text tradition, and exegesis of selected New Testament writings.

GRE 233 Greek Drama: Aristophanes
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 333. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

Close reading of Attic comedy in all its vulgarity and sublimity, with a view to performance and in light of current scholarship.

GRE 244 Greek Historians: Herodotus
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 344. (Spring)

Instructor
Toumazou

Readings of select passages from Herodotus's Histories, of the rest in English and of secondary literature for understanding of Herodotus's style and importance.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 266 Greek Philosophers: Plato's Gorgias
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 366. (Tentatively scheduled for Spring 2018.)

Instructor
Toumazou

Introduction to the Platonic dialogue, with special attention devoted to the relationship between philosophy, rhetoric, poetry, and desire.

GRE 311 Homer
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Cheshire

Close readings of Homeric poetry in light of current scholarship and the epic cycle.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 314 Greek Tragedy: Sophocles' Oedipus the King
Prerequisites & Notes

(Tentatively scheduled for Fall 2017.)

Instructor
Toumazou

A close reading in Greek of Sophocles' Oedipus the King in light of its context and current scholarship.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 318 New Testament Greek
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Krentz

Introduction to the language, text tradition, and exegesis of selected New Testament writings.

GRE 333 Greek Drama: Aristophanes
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Cheshire

Close reading of Attic comedy in all its vulgarity and sublimity, with a view to performance and in light of current scholarship.

GRE 344 Greek Historians: Herodotus
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Toumazou

Readings of select passages from Herodotus's Histories, of the rest in English and of secondary literature for understanding of Herodotus's style and importance.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 366 Greek Philosophers: Plato's Gorgias
Prerequisites & Notes

(Tentatively scheduled for Spring 2018.)

Instructor
Toumazou

Introduction to the Platonic dialogue, with special attention devoted to the relationship between philosophy, rhetoric, poetry, and desire.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 399 Independent Study in Greek
Prerequisites & Notes

Greek 201 and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Staff

Readings and research on Greek texts, under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) and evaluates the student’s work.

GRE 499 Senior Thesis
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Writing of a thesis under the supervision of an appropriate professor. Oral defense before the entire classics faculty required. Admission by unanimous consent of the Department of Classics.

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Fall only.)

Instructor
Cheshire

Introduction to classical Latin. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers.

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Spring only.)

Instructor
Cheshire

Continuing introduction to classical Latin. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers.

LAT 201 Intermediate Latin
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered annually, Fall only.)

Instructor
Neumann

Readings in Latin literature.

LAT 211 Roman Epic: Vergil's Aeneid
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 311. (Tentatively scheduled for Spring 2018)

Instructor
Neumann

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 221 Roman Comedy
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 321. (Fall)

Instructor
Neumann

The course focuses on the comedies of Plautus and Terence, with attention to the wider context of Roman Comedy's adaptation of Greek material and farcical "daily life" plot lines.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 222 Roman Lyric and Elegy: Catullus
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 322. (Tentatively scheduled for Fall 2017)

Instructor
Cheshire

Close reading of selections from Latin lyric and elegiac poetry.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 223 Cicero
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 323. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

Introduction to the life and work of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), senior statesman of the Roman Republic, and the various prose genres in which Cicero wrote: speeches, rhetorical and philosophical works, and letters.

LAT 224 Pastoral Poetry: Vergil
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 324. (Spring)

Instructor
Cheshire
 

Introduction to Vergil's Georgics, with special attention devoted to the poem's participation in literary, philosophical, and didactic traditions.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 226 Latin Inscriptions
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 326. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Totten

This course introduces students to the study of Latin inscriptions, with particular attention given to developing the ability to read and place in their cultural and historical context various types of inscriptions, such as epitaphs, laws, poems, and brickstamps.

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 

LAT 228 Roman Tragedy: Seneca
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 328. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

A close reading in Latin of a Senecan tragedy in light of current scholarship and the rest of his tragic corpus.

LAT 234 Latin Philosophical Poetry
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 334. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

An examination of Roman verse responses to Hellenistic philosophy, principally Lucretius and Horace.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 238 Roman Satire
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 338. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

A close reading of material from the Roman satirical tradition in light of historical context and current scholarship.

LAT 241 Civil Wars
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 341. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Totten

This course investigates narratives of civil war in the Roman world, with a focus on the conflict between Caesar and Pompey. We will study the contemporary sources (Caesar's writings and Cicero's Letters), as well as how this war was remembered in Lucan's Bellum Civile.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 244 Roman Historians
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 344. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

Students will read selections of Tactitus' Annales, a history of Rome's first imperial dynasty.

LAT 255 Latin Prose Composition
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 355. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

An intensive review of Latin syntax and an introduction to Latin prose rhetoric through selected reading and directed composition. 

LAT 266 Latin Philosophical Writing: The Summum Bonum
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 366. (Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Neumann

This course explores how to live well from the perspective of representative Roman writers. Cicero and Seneca will provide the Stoic viewpoint, countered later in the course by Lucretius and Horace.  

Satisfies Philosophical and Religious Perspectives.

LAT 277 Christian Latin Writers
Prerequisites & Notes

Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 377.

Instructor
Foley

Readings and research on selected Christian Latin authors from 200-600, including Tertullian, Cyprian, Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, and Gregory the Great.

LAT 311 Roman Epic: Vergil's Aeneid
Prerequisites & Notes

(Tentatively scheduled for Spring 2018.)

Instructor
Neumann


Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 321 Roman Comedy
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Neumann

The course focuses on the comedies of Plautus and Terence, with attention to the wider context of Roman Comedy's adaptation of Greek material and farcical "daily life" plot lines.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 322 Roman Lyric and Elegy: Catullus
Prerequisites & Notes

(Tentatively scheduled for Fall 2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 324 Pastoral Poetry: Vergil
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Cheshire

Introduction to Vergil's Georgics, with special attention devoted to the poem's participation in literary, philosophical, and didactic traditions.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 328 Roman Tragedy: Seneca
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cheshire

A close reading in Latin of a Senecan tragedy in light of current scholarship and the rest of his tragic corpus.

LAT 334 Latin Philosophical Poetry
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-2017.)


Instructor
Neumann

An examination of Roman verse responses to Hellenistic philosophy, principally Lucretius and Horace.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 338 Roman Satire
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

A close reading of materian from the Roman satyrical tradition in light of historical context and current scholarship.

LAT 341 Civil Wars
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Totten

This course investigates narratives of civil war in the Roman world, with a focus on the conflict between Caesar and Pompey. We will study the contemporary sources (Caesar's writings and Cicero's Letters), as well as how this war was remembered in Lucan's Bellum Civile.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 344 Roman Historians
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Students will read selections of Tactitus' Annales, a history of Rome's first imperial dynasty.

LAT 366 Latin Philosophical Writing: The Summum Bonum
Prerequisites & Notes

LAT 266  

LAT 377 Christian Latin Writers (=REL 347)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Foley

(Religion 347) The theological and historical development of the early church from the New Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon (451 C.E.) with a focus on early controversies as revealed through primary sources.

LAT 399 Independent Study in Latin
Prerequisites & Notes

Latin 201 and permission of the instructor.

Readings and research on Latin texts, under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) and evaluates the student’s work.

LAT 499 Senior Thesis
Prerequisites & Notes

Writing of a thesis under the supervision of an appropriate professor. Oral defense before the entire classics faculty required. Admission by unanimous consent of the Department of Classics.

PHI 105 Ancient Greek Philosophy
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Studtmann

Introduction to the origins and development of philosophy in ancient Greece, with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. 

Counts towards the satisfaction of the Philosophy major requirement to take two courses from amoung PHI 105, PHI 106, and PHI 107.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.


Counts as a Western Europe area course in the International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Counts towards the major in Classics.

POL 202 Classical Political Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ahrensdorf

Through a study of works by Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle, this course examines the Socratic revolution in the history of thought, why Socrates founded political philosophy, and the radical challenge that classical political philosophy poses to modern and contemporary political thought.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Counts towards the major in Classics.

 

POL 401 Thucydides on Justice and War
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor
Ahrensdorf

This course investigates arguments for and against both political realism and political idealism through a study of the founder of classical realism, Thucydides.

Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

REL 130 Introduction to the New Testament
Prerequisites & Notes

 

Not open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add or to students who have taken Religion 230 or 231.

This course may be applied towards a Classics major.

Instructor
Snyder

Who was Jesus of Nazareth? How were traditions about him remembered, gathered, and put in literary form? How different are the individual gospels? What were the issues that Paul addressed as he wrote to the churches he founded? How should we understand the Book of Revelation? How (and when) did all these writings come to form the collection now known as the New Testament? These are a few of the questions to be explored.

 

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
 

 

 

REL 231 Paul: the Renegade Apostle
Prerequisites & Notes

 

 

Instructor
Snyder

Paul is now enshrined in Christian history and dogma, yet few people realize how controversial his original message was. Many of Jesus's first followers were suspicious of Paul and there were fierce and public debates over his "gospel."  By a careful inspection of his letters we'll explore these debates and seek to understand the nature of the little groups he founded in cities around the Mediterranean. Some of these groups survived, and some disappeared: what held them together? Why would someone be drawn to Paul and his preaching? What was appealing about the life of these groups? The goal is to understand Paul and his theological ideas in their first-century context.

 

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

 

This course may be applied towards a Classics major.

REL 242 The Rise of Christianity
Prerequisites & Notes

This course may be applied towards a Classics major.

Instructor
Foley

The theological and historical development of the early church from the New Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon (451 C.E.) with a focus on early controversies as revealed through primary sources.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 341 Religions of the Roman Empire
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

This course is also cross-listed with Classics and could be applied towards a Classics major.

 

Instructor
Snyder

An examination of public cult under the Roman Empire: sacrifices, divination, priesthoods and holidays, as well as the religious groups devoted to Isis, Mithras, Moses and Christ.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 345 Early Christian Texts on Poverty
Prerequisites & Notes

This course is also cross-listed with Classics and could be applied towards a Classics major.

Students at all levels welcome.

Instructor
Foley

This course examines early Christian discussions about the poor, the role of almsgiving in Christian life and the problems-as well as the possibilities-of wealth. Texts to be studied include relevant selections from the Christian Bible, The Shepherd of Hermas, 2 Clement, Cyprian On Works and Alms, Augustine's Enchiridion, John Chrysostom's sermons and other relevant Christian texts written before the modern period. This course will also attempt to put these early Christian texts in dialogue with modern debates on poverty and economic inequality.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.