• English countryside by Caroline Queen '14

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  • The Peru Program in Arequipa includes trips to varied Peruvian landscapes from coastal desert to mountainous highlands to Amazonian jungle. Photo by Ivana Masimore '14

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  • Turkey by Yasmin Shahida '14

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Travel Grants

The Dean Rusk International Studies Program awards grants to Davidson students and faculty members for research, study, service, internships, and experiential learning abroad. Grants are awarded twice each year–once in the fall, for projects during winter break and spring semester, and once in the spring, for summer, fall and year-long projects. Applications are reviewed by the Dean Rusk International Studies Program's staff and by the faculty's International Education Committee.

The goals of the student-grant program are to facilitate student interaction with diverse cultures, languages, environments, standards of living, and political climates and to encourage independent student research. To achieve this, the International Education Committee has shown a strong preference for long-term independent projects that have a high degree of cultural interaction.

Meet with a Travel Grant Advisor

Information sessions on Dean Rusk, Pulitzer, and International Sustainability Project travel grants are held at the beginning of each semester in the Duke International Studies Lounge. Global Corps, a student group on campus, offers one-on-one counseling for students interested in Dean Rusk grants. To meet with a Global Corps Travel Grant Advisor, or to find out the dates for the next information session and application deadline, email Sarah Taylor '15 at sntaylor@davidson.edu.

Student Grant

The Common Application encompasses proposals for the Dean Rusk Travel Grant, Abernethy Grant and the Kemp Scholarship.

General Grants

The Dean Rusk International Studies Program provides grant-funded opportunities for student study, research, service, and experiential learning abroad in geographic locations of the student's choosing.

Grants ranging from $100 to over $5,000 are awarded two times each year.

  1. Fall cycle awards will be limited to the following:
    • Seniors who have never been abroad during their Davidson careers;
    • Seniors who need to travel abroad to conduct research for a thesis or capstone project;
    • Students participating in select Davidson summer study abroad programs (talk with your program director or with the Program Coordinator to find out if you should apply in the fall or the spring).
  2. Spring cycle awards are made for summer study, research, service, and experiential learning abroad. Proposals are considered from all students (except graduating seniors). The committee prefers individual projects that involve extended periods of time abroad and that reflect a clear connection to the student's academic development.

Dean Rusk supports these and other proposals through specific funds including several which are focused on the following regions or issues: East Asia, Central or South America, Arabic and Middle Eastern studies, economic research in developing countries, independent arts projects, and religious diversity abroad. However, students may propose any type of project as long as it has an international focus.

Students who are applying for a grant to travel abroad (independently or in association with a program) should use the online Common Grant Application. Review our Application Tips (DOC) on how to craft your proposal.

Pulitzer Center Grants

Each spring, two Davidson students are selected to receive grants in order to complete an independent multimedia international reporting project. The project should focus on a systemic issue of global importance that is under-reported or unreported in U.S. mainstream media. The grant recipients will receive exclusive training, support and mentorship from staff at the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

While working on your project in the field, a member of the Pulitzer Center staff will serve as your editor - establishing deadlines and assisting you in crafting publishing-worthy pieces. As a grant recipient, you will also choose a past Pulitzer Center journalist to serve as a professional mentor (subject to availability) who will offer practical advice and non-editorial support. Working closely with Pulitzer Center staff and a Pulitzer Center journalist mentor, recipients will build on their project proposal and decide on a plan of deliverables that will include some combination of maintaining a blog, taking photographs, recording audio, shooting video, writing articles for the Pulitzer Center website, and potentially seeking other outlets for their work.  Previous experience in photography or filming is not a prerequisite for applying for this grant. Dean Rusk encourages students to rent free equipment (such as cameras and editing software) from ITS, if necessary. Recipients are required to adhere to the Pulitzer Center's Ethics and Standards Policy throughout the reporting project, meet with the Pulitzer Center journalist visiting Davidson's campus during the semester that they receive the grant, and upon completing their trip, will be expected to turn in all of their deliverables prior to receiving the final installment of their grant.

In summer 2013, Davidson's reporting fellows traveled to India and the West Bank to complete their projects. Jonathan Cox '14 documented how farming families navigate the urban healthcare system in the Andhra Pradesh province of southeast India and had an article published in the The New York Times. Adrian Fadil '14 explored how Palestinian farmers have deployed innovative methods to sustain their lands while under occupation. Their work can be accessed on the Pulitzer Center website. Davidson's 2014 reporting fellows, Katie Mathieson '15 and Jessie Li '15, reported on grassroots environmentalist movements in Patagonia and institutional barriers for students with physical disabilities in China, respectively.

A strong proposal includes:

  • What issue the applicant wants to address
  • Whose stories he/she wants to tell
  • Where the applicant will travel to cover the issue
  • Which media the applicant thinks will tell the story best
  • Who or what kinds of people the applicant plans to talk to, how he/she will make the material accessible to lay audiences
  • How the project matches the Pulitzer Center's goal of focusing on under reported systemic issues of global importance
  • What the applicant hopes to get from the project and why the project interests the applicant

To apply, complete the Pulitzer Reporting Grant Application (DOC) and email it to Meg Sawicki at mesawicki@davidson.edu by 5 p.m. on the deadline. Review our Application Tips (DOC) on how to craft your proposal.

International Sustainability Projects

The Dean Rusk International Studies Program and the Office of Sustainability invite proposals for projects that develop innovative responses to pressing sustainability challenges abroad. “Sustainability” refers to the “triple bottom line” that connects social equity, environmental integrity, and economic prosperity. Proposed projects should address and connect at least two of these values. Projects that develop compelling responses to their chosen challenge may apply for a second grant for implementation.

The purpose of an International Sustainability Project is to give pairs of students the opportunity to engage with a community outside of the United States, identify a sustainability question, and work cross-culturally to find a solution.

Guidelines:

  • Proposals should come from two-person teams
  • Proposals should identify the specific sustainability issue to be addressed and the specific location in which the team proposes to work
  • Recipients will spend at least six weeks in the field, studying their issue, meeting with local stakeholders, and developing a plan that addresses the issue
  • Recipients will develop at least one product, service, or information output that they will deliver to local stakeholders before returning to the US
  • Recipients who develop compelling, sustainable solutions may apply for a second round of funding to return to their location, refine their product, and hand it off to local stakeholders.

To apply for International Sustainability Project funding, please download the application, read the guidelines on the first page, complete the second page, and email your team's International Sustainability Project application (DOC) to the Dean Rusk Program Coordinator Meg Sawicki at mesawicki@davidson.edu.

Faculty Grants

Faculty grants are available to conduct research or attend conferences abroad. Applications are due in the fall for winter break and spring semester projects; and in the spring for summer break and fall semester projects. Complete the Faculty Grant Application (DOC).